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Learn The Yorkshire Lingo


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So you decided to come to the good ol’ county of Yorkshire... What you didn't realise was that you were landing yourself in the middle of a swarm of people speaking one of the broadest accents of all- its as thick as our gravy! There's no escaping it- you'll have to master t'lingo to get by and blend in with the locals without arousing suspicion!

Learn The Yorkshire Lingo

First things first… hello

Yorkshire folk are some of the friendliest people you’ll meet, so don’t frown if your greeted in any of the following ways, their just saying hello.

Ey up, ow do?

In English this means “Hello, how are you?”, you’ll soon get used to this one.

Now then

Sometimes pronounced 'naah then', this means the same. It can sound intimidating, but it just means they're comfortable with you.

Ahhz it guin?

Believe it or not this means “How are you?”

 

You’ll hear the letter ‘T’ a lot…

In Yorkshire the word ‘the’ is not included in our dictionary, instead we use t’letter ‘t’ as an extension to words- so we say “I’m of t’shop”. We’ve all heard the rumours about this word’s existence, but we just don’t find it necessary.

Don't get "going t'werk" confused with the dance either- it means someone is going to work - not going to twerk...Sorry!

 

We can be lazy when we pronounce our words

We also use the letter ‘t’ when shortening words too. 'Anything' becomes 'owt', 'nothing' becomes 'nowt'. For example... "D'ya want owt from t'shop?"

We also say ‘eh’ whenever we don’t understand something. Short, sweet but extremely effective, in Yorkshire uttering these two letters is the best way of signifying your absolute confusion.

If a word starts with a ‘h’ we don’t say it. So when we are talking about keeping our hairdos in place we use ‘airspray not hairspray!

 

Yorkshire word variations

Relationships have been forever ruined by arguments around the different word variations, if you are new to Yorkshire engage at your own risk, Yorkshire men and women won’t budge with these so you’re better off learning them.

Bread cake - this is used instead of bread roll/ tea cake/ bap.

Ginnel /gennel/snicket - Alleyway

Flippin’ eck! - Wow!

Eeh by gum - Oh my God

Mardy - Moody

Reight – Right/Very

Finally, lunch can be called dinner and dinner can be called tea. We even confuse ourselves with this one sometimes.


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