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Leeds Beckett celebrate the first BA (Hons) Fashion degree Show


Showcasing the exemplary talent this new course has attracted from around the UK, the inaugural Leeds Beckett University BA (Hons) Fashion graduate runway show took place to a packed audience at Leeds’s iconic Royal Armouries on Tuesday 30 May.

Leeds Beckett celebrate the first BA (Hons) Fashion  degree Show

Each student presented between four and six outfits from their graduate collection, demonstrating incredible talent in textile design, recycling, cultural appreciation, and tailoring - all drawing on a diverse and eclectic mix of influences to create garments of an exceptionally high standard.

Dr Chris Harris, Principal Lecturer and the Academic Lead for the Design area of the School of Art, Architecture and Design at Leeds Beckett, welcomed the crowd and thanked all those who made the show happen. He said, “The show is a culmination of three years of hard work by staff and students and so is a momentous occasion.”

Course Director for BA (Hons) Fashion, Katie Lenton, ensured that backstage ran smoothly. As well as managing 30 models with several costume changes, Katie was also responsible for briefing the the hair team - a collaboration between Architect Hair, Headingley and HOB Salons, Leeds - plus make-up by White Rose College media make-up students. Original music for the show was created by Hudson Creative.

 

The Collections

Nilza Mendes Pires Dos Santos

Using hand-dyed calico fabric Nilza’s over-sized collection draws inspirations from the everyday ill-fitting ragged wardrobe of lower class Victorian children, sent to work from a very young age.

 

Harriet Smaller

Harriet has used water to inspire her final collection, with the silhouettes and prints being inspired by the results of her experimenting by freezing, boiling and submerging fabrics.

 

Rocio Mena Moscoso

Taking inspiration from animal skins and Samurai warriors traditional dress, Roccio’s collection uses braided horse hair and soldered and shaved sheepskins to create strong silhouettes and tactile material palette.

 

Mary Mellor

A reinterpretation of 1941 WW2 ration fashion has been brought into 2017 with Mary’s collection she explores ways design elements can be re-used and re-cycled in menswear.

 

Jessica Barker-Gilholme

Jessica was inspired by beautiful photography of Mia Jane Harris featuring human and animal innards which she has explored through silhouettes fabrics and colours throughout her collection.

 

Natasha Parker

Natasha takes inspiration from her personal love of oversized style combined with the wardrobe of Queen Elizabeth 1st with historical details deconstructed with modern fabrics being a focus of the collection.

 

Bethany Rowbotham

Bethany has been inspired by deterioration, her collection has explored destroyed buildings and garments - using light tactile patch- work lace and organza mixed with burning techniques to add a harder edge.

 

Samantha Worrilow

Samantha has deconstructed and reimagined the mens suit for the female form combined with photocopied digital prints and fax paper her collection is inspired by sexual harassment and feminism workplace.

 

Alex Knowles

Inspired by gender stereotypes Alex has explored WWE and bodybuilding in the 90s compared with today’s society, the silhouettes are inspired by enlarged wrestlers’ bodies contrasted with the colours and accents reflecting femininity.

 

Sehar Hussain

This collection was inspired by Sehar’s multi-cultural background, from Pakistan to Dewsbury, creating a hybrid style by collaging eastern and western garments together.

 

Stevie Tough

Inspired by fabric and process this collection explores texture, surface and weight by incorporating painted tulle fabric, chunky knit, digital print and concrete to create impossible surfaces.

 

Ebony Yeardley

Ebony’s collection ‘Never mind the Bollywood’ combines inspiration from the 1970 punk era with Bollywood films. Embroidered Indian fabrics are combined with tartan, hardware and raw denim as well as original printed illustrations.

 

Emma Oram

Emma has created her collection with silhouettes and fabrication inspired by Japanese graffiti artist HUSH her collection has combined streetwear with traditional Japanese dress, this mixing of East and West reflects Hush’s work.

 

Emily Isherwood

Inspired by Hindu, Buddhist, Aghori, and Sadhu monks, influenced by an image of monks playing basketball Emily has incorporated sportswear and technical fabrics into her collection.

 

Natasha Payne

Natasha’s collection is set 1,000 years from now, Earth is no longer habitable with 100 humans moving to Kepler 452B, designed with adaptability and functionality for survival, heavily featuring pockets and waterproofs

 

Charlie Jarvis

Charlie’s collection is inspired by 18th century Harewood House and Lady Worsley, the interior decorations influenced the colours and the silhouette inspired by historical garments of the time.

 

Katie Benson

Inspired by connection Katie has used stretch fabrics, oversized silhouettes, and tactile surfaces to explore the connections between the body, the garment and the space between.

 

Phillena Bremner

Inspired by psychological thriller Hannibal, Phillena’s collection features prints of poisonous flowers, cut outs to mimic butchery and sharp tailoring to mask the cannibal beneath.

 

Helen Dobson

Taking inspiration from every day Cuban life and people, Helen has created a self-style able collection featuring multiple brightly coloured outfit combinations combining tweed, jersey and silk.

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