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Research Case studies

"Double-jointed" soccer players have more injuries


Professor Mark Johnson’s research investigates the science of pain and its management. He conducts Cochrane reviews and meta-analyses, experimental studies on human participants and clinical trials on patients experiencing pain. His main programmes of research include factors influencing response to electrophysical agents; factors influencing pain sensitivity response; the epidemiology of pain in developing countries; pain, memory, motor imagery and perceptual embodiment.

Established in 1992, we have received international recognition for our research on the science of pain and its management. Our team consists of staff and students who conduct systematic reviews, experimental studies on human participants and clinical trials on patients experiencing pain. We have published over 140 studies and chapters in major pain textbooks and have showcased our research at the Royal Society's Summer Science exhibition, the Royal Institution's Science Day and Techfest 2008 (Asia's largest technology festival). We have research partnerships across the globe and much experience of supporting international students who collect data in their home country. Our research is supported by our Pain Research Laboratory that houses a range of psychophysiological and biochemical equipment.

Representative Publications:
Exemplar areas for degree supervision:
  • Factors influencing response to electrophysical treatments such as transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS), acupuncture, low level laser therapy and physiotherapy techniques such as massage, manipulation and mobilisation.
  • Factors influencing pain sensitivity response including sex and gender, ethnocultural background, obesity and tissue acidosis.
  • The epidemiology of pain in developing countries.
  • Pain, memory, motor imagery and perceptual embodiment.
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