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Children, Young People and Families

Children, Young People and Families

Children Young People and Families

Children, Young People and Families provides a forum for the discussion of and response to complex and often challenging sociocultural issues surrounding all aspects of:

  • Social justice.
  • Child development.
  • Child protection.
  • Looked-after children.
  • Children’s health and well-being.
  • Children and young people’s services.
  • Family values and policy implementation.

Adopting a wide range of positions and methodological approaches to enhance its research activities, the group’s intention is to better understand, inform and improve the lives and education of children, young people and families, the wider communities in which they live, work and play, and the practitioners and other professionals with whom they interact.

Children Young People and Families Research Projects

Surveillance and Simulation in Schools

Teacher surveillance has become embedded within almost every aspect of school life and the practices of teaching and learning. This project explores the concept of surveillance within schools – from traditional forms, such as lesson observations, to more contemporary forms, such as learning walks and the live streaming of classroom activities - and its impact. The aim is to better understand how increasingly intrusive surveillance strategies affect the work of schools and the relationships of those who learn within them. Drawing on the work of Baudrillard, the authenticity of practice under the intensity of the surveillant assemblage and the extent to which teaching and learning become simulations instead of real experiences are questioned.

Academic lead: Dr Damien Page

Therapeutic Landscapes of Schooling

This project draws upon recent interest in the realities of schooling to explore how young people’s everyday well-being is mediated by the objects and architecture of educational spaces. Taking the school sickroom as a focal point, it seeks to understand how the assemblage of human and non-human factors within this space contributes to affective and embodied experiences of health and illness for young people. Working with primary schools in the north of England, the project adopts a material-semiotic approach, exploring the nature of the space and the everyday human and non-human interactions that occur within it. Outcomes will generate new theoretical understandings of the therapeutic potential of school spaces and could shape the ways in which school sickrooms are organised.

Academic lead: Dr Jo Pike

Published Research

Publications