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Dr Alan Dunn


Dr Alan Dunn
Contact Details
Dr Alan Dunn

Senior Lecturer

School of Art, Architecture & Design

0113 81 23908 A.Dunn@leedsbeckett.ac.uk

About Dr Alan Dunn

Alan Dunn studied at Glasgow School of Art and School of the Art Institute of Chicago. His research explores new models for curating content for non-gallery audiences and his recent PhD considered the relationship between sound art and the everyday.

Dr. Alan Dunn (b. 1967, Glasgow) was curator of The Bellgrove Station Billboard Project (Glasgow 1990-91), lead artist on the tenantspin project (FACT, Liverpool 2001-7) and recently completed a PhD on sound art based on the 10xCD opus The sounds of ideas forming.

Through these projects Dunn has developed collaborative content with Bill Drummond, Douglas Gordon, Yoko Ono, Philip Jeck, Pauline Oliveros and Brian Eno. He currently lives and works in Liverpool and is a Senior Lecturer at Leeds Beckett University where he co-runs the MA Art & Design course.

In 2012 he was short-listed for the Liverpool Art Prize and is the joint arts editor of the online journal Stimulus Respond. He is a Board Member of East Street Arts in Leeds and co-owner of Alternator Studio in Birkenhead.

Current Teaching

  • BA Fine Art, Level 6 studio and written components
  • MA Art & Design, studio and written component modules
  • Advanced Professional Diploma in Professional Practice in Art and Design, studio and written components
  • PhD supervision, Peter Blagg, 2012-18

Research Interests

Alan's current research is twofold. One area concentrates on the recent technical developments in electronic billboards and their potential to host artistic content. In January 2016 he curated one hour's worth of content for Europe's largest moving image screen opposite Lime Street station in Liverpool.

The second area is an ongoing investigation into the relationship between sound art and the everyday, using live events, CDs and broadcasts to introduce new audiences to audio material from a range of professionals and community members. This research has been recognised by Arts Council England amongst others as good practice in the development of non-gallery cultural practice and by academics in relation to sound art pedagogy.

Dunn’s research has been based around curatorial models that bring together works by students alongside recognised international practitioners. Responding to set themes and contexts, Dunn invites practitioners to develop digital billboards (eg Four Words, 2016-date), soundworks (eg The Eighth Wonder, 2017) or text contributions. He has a particular interest through these projects in creative uses of the word ‘revolution’ – in sound and print – and the notion of participatory projects that are ‘cover versions’ and adaptations of previous projects (eg TAPE BRITAIN, 2014). 

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