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Dr Lindsey Thiel


Dr Lindsey Thiel
Contact Details
Dr Lindsey Thiel

Senior Lecturer

School Of Social Sciences

0113 81 26574 L.Thiel@leedsbeckett.ac.uk

About Dr Lindsey Thiel

Lindsey is a speech and language therapy researcher and clinician and has recently been appointed as Senior Lecturer at Leeds Beckett University.

Lindsey graduated from her first degree in Linguistics and German in 2002 and taught in a variety of educational settings in Germany. She then went on to study Speech and Language therapy at the University of Manchester and subsequently undertook an MRes and PhD in Psychology. Lindsey’s research has focused on measuring the effects of writing therapies and technologies for people with aphasia and acquired dysgraphia, but she is interested in all aspects of aphasia rehabilitation and in generally improving the quality of life of people with communication disorders. Lindsey has also worked clinically as an adult community speech and language therapist. She is registered with the Health Care Professions Council and is a fully certified member of the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists. She is a committee member of the British Aphasiology Society.

Current Teaching

Lindsey contributes to the teaching of research methods, acquired communication disorders and clinical and professional skills for the BSc Speech and Language Therapy course. She also supervises student research projects.

Research Interests

Lindsey’s MRes and PhD project, entitled "Applying therapies and technologies to the treatment of dysgraphia: combining neuropsychological techniques and compensatory devices to enhance use of the internet in people after brain injury", was funded by the Economic and Social Research Council. This study investigated whether a combined approach to writing therapy, including impairment-based therapies and assistive technologies, could improve the email writing of participants with varying severity of acquired dysgraphia.

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