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Dr Pauline Fitzgerald


About Dr Pauline Fitzgerald

Pauline completed her PhD part time at Leeds University whilst working in the NHS as a biomedical scientist in the microbiology lab at Leeds General Infirmary. She began working at Leeds Beckett University in 1998.

Pauline’s research interests are two fold: she maintains an interest in molecular biology and infectious diseases, but as a university teacher fellow and Senior Fellow of the Higher Education academy she has presented her work on employability and transferable skills at national conferences and has several papers in peer reviewed journals. This work has also won university awards, and she was nominated for a National Teaching Fellowship in 2016

Pauline has a PGCHE from the Open University, is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Biology and a member of the Microbiology Society.


Current Teaching

Pauline is a senior lecturer in the School of Clinical and Applied Sciences, teaching on the Biomedical Sciences courses.

Pauline teaches across a range of subjects, primarily molecular biology, microbiology and employability/ enterprise

Modules taught include:

  • Introduction to Biomedical Sciences
  • Infectious Diseases
  • Enterprise in biomedical sciences
  • Project supervision.

Research Interests

Pauline is keen on developing innovative ways of teaching, and has developed lots of different tutorial activities which can be delivered face to face, or on line. Her most recent area of interest however is in the delivery of transferable skills, including numeracy, employability and enterprise skills and how students perceive their development when the skills are embedded into modules as part of a biomedical sciences course. This work has been presented at several conferences. She recently obtained funding from the Higher education academy to profile her work at a workshop on Work related learning without placements- an alternative way of providing employability skills.

As a molecular microbiologist Pauline has also worked with the Pain research team on a study of the genetic implications of pain management, and with the Biomedicine group looking at wound healing.

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