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Dr Tom Goodwin


Dr Tom Goodwin
Contact Details
Dr Tom Goodwin

Senior Lecturer

School Of Social Sciences

0113 81 23293 T.W.Goodwin@leedsbeckett.ac.uk

About Dr Tom Goodwin

Dr Tom Goodwin is a Senior Lecturer in Social Psychology and a Course Leader for the BA (Hons) in Social Psychology.

Tom joined our University in 2007. He taught across a range of social science subjects before becoming a permanent member of the social psychology team in 2011. Tom leads modules in interdisciplinary psychology, psychoanalysis, social psychology, radical psychology and a new course on madness.

Tom has a diverse academic background that reflects the interdisciplinary ethos of the psychology provision in the school. This includes an undergraduate degree in Psychology, an MA in Psychoanalysis, a PhD in English Literature, and a long-standing interest in and practise of fine art.

His teaching and research draws on a range of radical philosophical approaches to situate psychology within a broader social and theoretical environment. Adopting a critical psychological framework that is underpinned specifically by psychoanalysis and theories of deconstruction, his work primarily explores the interface between psychology and other subject areas such as literature, art, linguistics and social theory.

Much of Tom's teaching is research led, incorporating elements from films and novels as much as it does from Freud and other innovators in psychology.

Current Teaching

  • Level 4 (first year):
    • Interdisciplinary Psychology
    • Doing Psychology
  • Level 5 (second year):
    • Psychoanalytic Contributions
    • Societal Psychology
  • Level 6 (third year):
    • Radical Psychology
    • Framing Madness

Research Interests

Tom's research emphasises an interdisciplinary approach to human inquiry. His PhD examined two Hungarian psychoanalysts Nicolas Abraham and Maria Torok and the possible implications and applications of their work for understanding human subjectivity and interpreting its personal, social and literary manifestations. More recently he has extended these ideas in papers on Freud's famous "Wolf Man" case and a reading of Edgar Allan Poe's 'The Fall of the House of Usher'.

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