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Kate Bancroft


About Kate Bancroft

Kate teaches at masters and undergraduate level on the following Carnegie School of Education degree courses: Teaching and Education, Childhood Studies and Early Years. She is also the Course Leader for BA (Hons) Childhood Studies.

Kate’s background is in secondary school Physical Education teaching. Across her seven-year career as a teacher she was also a Pastoral Leader, Head of Department, Head of Faculty and an Assistant Headteacher and worked in four different secondary schools across Leeds, Halifax and Bradford. She joined the Carnegie School of Education as a lecturer in September 2017.

Kate is also a member on the Carnegie Centre for LGBTQ+ Inclusion in Education. The Centre is committed to challenging all forms of prejudice, discrimination and marginalisation towards individuals and collectives in schools and colleges who identify as Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Trans, Queer/ Questioning and others who have gender identities or sexual orientations that differ from the heterosexual and cisgender majority. Through its research the centre members provide evidence-based recommendations to support the development of LGBTQ inclusion in education.

Outside of her university role, Kate also works as a Quality Assurance Reviewer for the examination board Pearson. In this role she applies her academic research to ensure that schools and educational settings are applying policies, such as their Equality and Diversity Policies, to a sufficiently high standard.

Current Teaching

  • Children, Crime and Social Justice
  • LGBT Children and Young People
  • Child Psychology
  • The Academic Self
  • Development and Childhood

Research Interests

Kate is currently studying towards a doctorate exploring the role of social media in enabling transgender young people to reconstruct, negotiate and manage their embodied identities.

The research explores the ways in which YouTube is experienced as a 'safe space' for the exploration of trans* identities and the ways in which transgender young people's vlogs can be useful in understanding the diversity of trans* identities.

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