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Transforming | Lives

Academics at our university inspire, challenge, listen and innovate. They transform the way our students think and view the world. Their teaching is the foundation for the student experience at Leeds Beckett, while their research directly impacts the way we lead our lives.

Our university is a community of great people – meet a handful of them below.

f equals group thumbnail

Dr Casey Orr Dr Liz Stirling and Dr Jo Hassall

f equals group thumbnail

Dr Casey Orr Dr Liz Stirling and Dr Jo Hassall

Dr Jill Gibbon

Dr Jill Gibbon

Dr Jill Gibbon

Dr Jill Gibbon

Harold Offeh

Harold Offeh

Harold Offeh

Harold Offeh

Sarah Cooper and Melissa Santos

Sarah and Melissa

Sarah Cooper and Melissa Santos

Sarah and Melissa

Dr Martin Pritchard

Dr Martin Pritchard

Dr Martin Pritchard

Dr Martin Pritchard

Zoe McClelland

Zoe McClelland

Zoe McClelland

Zoe McClelland

Professor Ralph Tench

Professor Ralph Tench

Professor Ralph Tench

Professor Ralph Tench

Professor Pinki Sahota

Professor Pinki Sahota

Professor Pinki Sahota

Professor Pinki Sahota

Nina Cuthbertson

Nina Cuthbertson

Nina Cuthbertson

Nina Cuthbertson

Emlyn Butterfield

Emlyn Butterfield

Emlyn Butterfield

Emlyn Butterfield

Dr Jessica van Horssen

Dr Jessica van Horssen

Dr Jessica van Horssen

Dr Jessica van Horssen

Dr Nasser Hussain

Dr Nasser Hussain

Dr Nasser Hussain

Dr Nasser Hussain

Dr James McGrath

Dr James McGrath

Dr James McGrath

Dr James McGrath

Dr Daniel Kilvington

Dr Dan Kilvington

Dr Daniel Kilvington

Dr Dan Kilvington

Professor Jayne Raisborough

Professor Jayne Raisborough

Professor Jayne Raisborough

Professor Jayne Raisborough

Professor Jonathan Glazzard

Professor Jonathan Glazzard

Professor Jonathan Glazzard

Professor Jonathan Glazzard

Professor Dorina Maria Buda

Professor Dorina Maria Buda

Professor Dorina Maria Buda

Professor Dorina Maria Buda

Kenn Scott

Ken Scott

Kenn Scott

Ken Scott

Professor Claire Surr

Professor Claire Surr

Professor Claire Surr

Professor Claire Surr

Deveral Capps and Dr Jessica Guth

Jessica and Deveral

Deveral Capps and Dr Jessica Guth

Jessica and Deveral

Dr Helen Nichols and Dr Bill Davies

Bill and Helen

Dr Helen Nichols and Dr Bill Davies

Bill and Helen

Dr Rachel Julian

Dr Rachel Julian

Dr Rachel Julian

Dr Rachel Julian

Professor Ben Jones

Professor Ben Jones

Professor Ben Jones

Professor Ben Jones

Transforming the way we express equality: “Our feminist approach offers students a space to discuss gender and equality through art and design practice.” - Dr Casey Orr, Dr Liz Stirling and Jo Hassall
Equality Through Art

Inspired by overhearing students saying “I’m not a feminist, but…” senior lecturers Casey Orr, Jo Hassall and Liz Stirling joined forces to form feminist research group F=. The trio designed F= to give students a platform to think about equality. Casey says: “We began to question how we could talk about feminism with students and create opportunities for them to discuss it through graphic art and design, without us just telling them what it is.”

Their combined expertise in photography, fine art and illustration means their individual skills and views complemented each other perfectly. “Our collaborative teaching is quite an unusual approach,” said Jo. “And we work in a playful and quite risky way. I think this has had some influence on the culture of teaching and research amongst people we work with in the school and with colleagues who teach in other faculties who are interested in applying some of these approaches within their own subject areas.”

Recent feminist movements, such as #MeToo and Equal Pay Day, have created opportunities for new discussions around equality, both on campus and across society.

“Our teenage daughters wear feminist t-shirts because it’s the cool thing to do now,” added Casey. “Young people are really mobilised by feminism at the minute. We especially see that with our students. They are constantly talking about it and commenting on feminist politics.” Considering their passion for equality and feminism, it is unsurprising that F= has had an impact on their teaching at Leeds Beckett. Some students may initially think, ‘Why are we doing this?’ but they soon see how inequality has affected everyone’s life in some way,” explains Liz. “Our feminist approach means students now actively want to talk about equality and inequality.”

Jo concluded: “We avoid imposing a fixed curriculum and because we work and learn alongside our students, we are in it with them so they feel comfortable in expressing their ideas. We have helped to make equality more visible - it’s like design activism.”

Dr Casey Orr, Senior Lecturer,
Dr Liz Stirling, Senior Lecturer,
Dr Jo Hassall, Senior Lecturer,
School of Art, Architecture and Design


Transforming the art of war - "I want my art to give an insight into arms fairs, where weapons are treated as products." - Dr Jill Gibbon, School of Art, Architecture and Design
The business of conflict

Jill, a senior lecturer in the School of Art, Architecture and Design, has been drawing arms fairs since 2007 under the guise of a ‘war artist’. After eventually being challenged by a security guard, who noticed that she was drawing the dealers as well as the weapons, she took drastic measures to ensure she could continue to shine a spotlight on the secretive world of the international arms trade. Creating a fake persona, company and website, Jill has continued to attend these events and capture the rituals of marketing, hospitality and dress, played out against a backdrop of violent weaponry.

She says: “I have been involved in the peace movement since the 1980s when I first moved to Leeds as a student. My work and my drawing has always been about peace and activism, and for a long time I would demonstrate with other protestors outside the arms fairs. I was frustrated by the fact that war art mostly concentrates on zones of conflict, such as Iraq and Afghanistan, and wanted to share an insight into the arms fairs, where weapons are sold to repressive regimes and countries involved in aggressive wars, fuelling conflict.”

Jill’s unique approach to art also informs her teaching, where she encourages her students to be bold. “My art practice and research are fundamental to my teaching,” she adds. “I encourage my students to think critically and to follow their hunches and their conscience about what matters, and also to be aware of the power of art. I think art can give insights into situations that other methods can’t.”

Dr Jill Gibbon, Senior Lecturer
School of Art, Architecture and Design


Transforming art: "Instagram is as valid an exploration of culture as a sculpture or a painting" - Harold Offeh - School of Art, Architecture & Design
Art for art's sake?

"I’m interested in how each generation of artists shifts and changes what art is. Art comes from the culture and society of today. Our students are cultural experts. My job is to help them recognise this and make use of that knowledge.

“As an artist engaged in performance, my work is not defined by materials but by actions. I want my audiences and students to examine their connection and interest in their own culture, as well as the cultures of others, particularly where that culture is found in everyday experiences and expressions. What they are watching, posting, playing, reading and listening to is potentially art. A performance via Instagram is as valid an exploration of culture as a sculpture or a painting.

“Fine art gives you a great deal of freedom, but that degree of independence takes discipline and motivation. The New York Times has described studying art as akin to studying a new business course. Fine art students study every creative and entrepreneurial process: research, development, production, presentation, evaluation and marketing.

“Every student artist follows this process. For me, it’s about a way of thinking and looking at the world. It's pure creative making and thinking! Equipped with this, they can and do anything and everything."

Harold Offeh, Reader in Fine Art
School of Art, Architecture & Design


Transforming your future: "It's great to work with students who are as enthusiastic about the subject as I am" - Sarah Cooper - Senior Lecturer / "It helps you understand what each of us is interested ni.  It makes us more creative." - Maria Santos, BA (Hons) Fashion Marketing student
Your time at uni

We have an innovative approach to teaching at Beckett. We want your education to increase your knowledge of a subject and develop wider skills that will future-proof your career. Senior Lecturer Sarah Cooper and student Melissa Santos share a conversation about teaching and learning on our BA (Hons) Fashion Marketing course:

Sarah: Fashion marketing, and fashion as a whole, is an exciting sector that moves quickly. This makes it a challenge to keep up to date with shifts in industry, but it’s one to relish. Establishing links with industry and making these links available to you, as students, builds a bridge for you between higher education and industry.

Melissa: You can tell that the content of our lectures is up to date with what’s happening with the world. And being able to talk to people who are working in the industry, doing the jobs that we want to do, is great We’re getting an insider’s perspective that we otherwise wouldn’t get, and it shows us that what we are learning is relevant. It’s helped me realise just how fast-paced the industry is, and I’m learning how to keep up with it through the weekly tasks you set.

Sarah: It’s great to be working with students who are as enthusiastic about the subject as I am. The way that you learn and I teach is really enhanced by the identity you have with our course community. If our course community is strong, you become more willing to engage.

Melissa: I think you definitely achieve that. It really helps that you understand what each of us is interested in. It makes us more creative. Your teaching allows us to explore so many themes through a wide range of materials. I’m also finding that working on extra activities is helping me grow as an individual. It’s given me a fresh way of looking at things and is allowing me to draw inspiration from lots of different sources. I think we’re in safe hands and I’m excited about the rest of my studies and all that the future holds for me in the fashion industry.

Melissa Santos, BA (Hons) Fashion Marketing student
Sarah Cooper, Senior Lecturer
School of Art, Architecture & Design


Transforming access to clean water: "Our research has discovered a solution that could reduce water-related diseases and save lives throughout the developing world." - Dr Martin Pritchard - School of Built Environment & Engineering
Thirst for knowledge

Clean drinking water is taken for granted by many of us. But a new and natural method of water purification developed by Leeds Beckett researchers could change the lives of thousands. The research team, led by Dr Martin Pritchard, from the School of Built Environment & Engineering, have identified a plant that grows naturally in Africa and can purify water, making it safe to drink and reducing the risk of disease from water contamination.

"The team from Leeds Beckett, which includes PhD students, have been undertaking research in Malawi for over 10 years with our partners there. Our research found that 80% of wells in Malawi contained water which was unsafe to drink. This led us to look for solutions, and we discovered a locally available plant extract that grows wild throughout Malawi and can be used to improve water quality by 80%. The use of this technology could significantly help to reduce water-related diseases and save lives throughout the developing world."

Dr Martin Pritchard, Reader in Civil Engineering
School of Built Environment & Engineering


Transforming business leadership - "Our business education helps to bridge the skills gap and is a vital part of our role in the region." - Zoe McClelland, Leeds Business School
Bridging the business skills gap

Understanding the changing needs of the region’s economy to give our graduates the best chance of success drives Zoe McClelland’s approach to her role as Head of Subject for Business Strategy, Operations and Enterprise. “Our business education helps to bridge the skills gap. It is a vital part of our role in the region,” says Zoe, who is also the school’s lead for graduate employability. We understand what employers need from graduates now and in the future. One of our strengths as a school is our regional focus; we work with employers to tailor our courses to deliver what is needed for the success of our region’s businesses.”

Zoe believes working with employers and giving students opportunities to develop their practical skills is essential. “We achieve this with a curriculum that reflects the attributes employers are looking for. We work with students to hone their skills so they are work-ready. We embed practical elements in courses like pitches and presentations, through to working on live briefs from professional clients. Currently, more than 300 of our students are engaging in live consultancy projects which benefits both our students and local businesses.”

Zoe led the Business School’s first Degree Apprenticeship course which now has over 100 employees working towards a BA (Hons) Business Management Practice. Zoe said: “Smart business leaders know it’s important to invest in their employees by enhancing their knowledge and broadening their skills. The result is increased performance and a more successful business. The modern apprenticeship model has a lot to offer; transforming employees and companies simultaneously is such a powerful thing. It’s all about applied learning, and taking what you’ve learnt in the course straight back into your business. This is precisely our university’s area of expertise.” Zoe’s subject group also specialises in research around productivity and competitiveness.

Zoe McClelland, Head of Subject in Business Strategy
Leeds Business School


Transforming communication: "Can excellence be achieved if we are always improving?" - Professor Ralph Tench - Leeds Business School
The pursuit of excellence

While business and industry may acknowledge the value of strategic communications, how is excellence achieved? Dr Ralph Tench, Director of Research at Leeds Business School, believes he may have the answer.

“I have used data from over 21,000 practitioners across Europe to develop the ‘nine commandments’ of communications excellence.” As President and Head of the Board of Directors for the European Public Relations Education and Research Association (EUPRERA), he has investigated a decade of data from the European Communication Monitor (the ECM), the largest global study of public relations and strategic communication practice. “ Companies want to understand what factors contribute to high performance in a competitive environment; what are highperforming organisations and departments doing to make their company or brand stand out?

"The research shows that high-performance communications operate on three levels – the organisation, the department and the individual. Each of these three levels has three essential traits that make up the ‘nine commandments’. Excellent communicators fulfil the requirements of each of these nine components. However, there is an intrinsic paradox. We can always improve. Therefore, can excellence ever be achieved?"

Ralph Tench, Professor of Communication and Director of Research
Leeds Business School


Transforming childhood nutrition: "Professionals and parents must work together to get young people up for a lifetime of good health." - Professor Pinki Sahota - School of Clinical & Applied Sciences
A complex challenge

Childhood obesity remains one of the most serious challenges facing society in the 21st century, with significant health, social and economic consequences. Pinki Sahota, Professor of Nutrition & Childhood Obesity, believes the battle against obesity requires more than eating less and moving more.

"With nearly one-in-three children considered obese by the time they leave primary school, people often want to know if there is a magic bullet. The truth is that obesity is a very complex issue, with no one simple answer. Of course, the quality and quantity of food eaten, as well as exercise, are important factors in maintaining a healthy weight for adults and children. Developments in banning some junk food advertising in print and online media are also good first steps, although there is more to be done here.

"However, we can be stacking the odds against children from a very early age when they have little control over their own health destinies and nutrition choices. If we are to turn things around, nutrition and childcare professionals must work together and join with parents to set our young people up for a lifetime of good health. It is clear that good healthy living habits that are established when children are very young are more likely to be maintained throughout life... and thus be more successful."

Pinki Sahota, Professor of Nutrition & Childhood Obesity
School of Clinical & Applied Sciences


Transforming Outdated Perceptions - "Being a woman should not be a barrier to success in any industry." - Nina Cuthbertson, Student, School of Computing, Creative Technologies and Engineering
Engineering a convention-busting career

Plotting an unconventional route to higher education, Nina Cuthbertson started her GCSEs in her early 20s after moving to the UK from her native Latvia. Inspired by her family’s deep ties to engineering – her mum is a civil engineer, her dad works in construction and her grandad was a train driver – she never wavered in the belief that she would follow in their footsteps. Nina explains: “When I was in Latvia I completed a course in railway engineering and worked at a maintenance depot. I had to start from scratch when I came to the UK in 2004, sitting my GCSEs and then undertaking a BTEC in Electrical and Electronics before being accepted onto my course at Leeds Beckett.”

Nina balances her part-time undergraduate degree with bringing up her six-year-old son and a part-time job. Although this brings a host of challenges, she is single-minded about where her degree will take her, saying: “It’s hard juggling everything but I’m focused and have a vision of where I want to be.” That vision is to become an engineer – and she isn’t going to be put off by outdated stereotypes that it is not a job for women.

“I believe the stereotypes aren’t as strong as they were 20 or 30 years ago,” she adds. “Yes, it’s a male dominated industry, but it’s starting to shift in my opinion. I’ve never felt intimidated by working in engineering. If you show that you actually know what you’re talking about, that you can bring something to the table, then you’ll be accepted. Being a woman should not be a barrier to success in any industry.”

Nina Cuthbertson, Student in Electronic and Electrical Engineering 
School of Computing, Creative Technologies & Engineering


Transforming our lives online: "We want to make the online environment safer for all." - Emlyn Butterfield - School of Computing, Creative Technologies & Engineering
Fighting international cybercrime

Cybercriminals pose a serious threat to security and privacy across modern society. International organisations and private individuals are equally at risk from attacks on their smart technologies and theft of valuable personal data. Innovations and research from the University’s Cybercrime & Security Innovation (CSI) Centre are part of the battle against this growing area of serious crime.

Course Director Emlyn Butterfield explains: “Every year, 5.1 million people – over 8% of the UK population – are the victims of cybercrime. These are old-fashioned crimes of theft and extortion which are increased in scale or reach by the use of computers, networks or other forms of communications technology.”

He argues that our reliance on technology in our daily lives makes us vulnerable. “We want our technology to give us more functionality, but that’s often at the expense of giving away our data and privacy. Data has become commodified and now has intrinsic value where previously it had none.”

As data increases in value, so it becomes more attractive to the criminals. Despite this, when new technology is developed, security aspects are often overlooked. As Emlyn explains, security is intrinsic to the design of these new innovations. “We work with regional and national law enforcement agencies to help them identify areas for improvement in fighting cybercrime. This is transforming the way digital crime is policed across the country. Our academics are at the forefront of digital security research and its translation to the real world. We want to make the online environment safer for all.”

Emlyn Butterfield, Course Director of Security and Forensics
School of Computing, Creative Technologies & Engineering


Transforming our environment - "I use the historical trail of plastic issues to work towards an environmental solution" - Dr Jessica van Horssen, School of Cultural Studies and Humanities
Tackling Nessie, the plastic monster

We are producing more plastic waste than ever before - and with devastating consequences. It is littering our cities, seas and waterways, and contributing to health problems in humans and animals.

Dr Jessica van Horssen, senior lecturer and environmental historian, sailed around the UK to assess the state of the waters and track the devastation humans are causing, witnessing first-hand the silent killer in our seas. Loch Ness in Scotland was a major focus on Jessica’s journey. She said: “Loch Ness is beautiful – over 200,000 tourists visit each year. But this intense human presence has massively impacted the local environment as well as the larger, global eco-systems the loch is connected to. The extent of the rubbish was clear to see - kids’ toys, styrofroam cups – the junk was endless. Plastic is so widely used and can do some amazing things, particularly in the medical world, but we just don’t know the extent of the damage it can do. Could the Loch Ness monster actually be a reflection of how humans have treated the marine environments of the world as bottomless waste disposal units? Plastic pollution is incredibly real, so not like Nessie in that way, but they are similar in that something dark and unknown lurks beneath the surface, and it's entirely created by humans. I’m interested in looking at the historical path on issues such as plastic. As a society, how do we deal with it? What have we let go of in order to favour convenience? This gives you a deeper sense of history; seeing a present day issue and following the historical trail, bringing the past and present together.”

The findings from Jessica and her team are helping to shape policy and drive recommendations on reducing plastic consumption. “By developing ways to reduce our plastic consumption, as well as better methods of disposing of waste responsibly, we have the opportunity to change the narrative. But we need to do this soon, as monsters like Nessie continue to lurk beneath the surface of our marine environments, getting larger and more irreversible each year.”

Dr Jessica van Horssen, Senior Lecturer
School of Cultural Studies & Humanities


Transforming the power of language - "Words are the raw material of culture." - Dr Nasser Hussain, School of Cultural Studies and Humanities
Beyond Words

Nasser, a Lecturer in English Literature and Creative Writing, is a published poet with two books to his name and more to come. His current project -SKY WRI TEI NGS- is a collection of poems based on the three-digit codes of airports around the world. He uses the poems to generate maps that show the flight path that poem would take around the globe, visiting the relevant airports.

“It may sound unusual, but that’s the beauty of creative writing. You can blur the edges; there are no rules, other than the ones you make for yourself. My inspiration for SKY WRI TEI NGS was the sometimes-unusual airport codes like YYZ for Toronto, which is where I am from, versus the rather straightforward MAN for Manchester International. The difference between these two was interesting to me, and led me to ask: How many airports are there that make words? The answer is: enough to write a book of poems! I find that by putting restrictions on writing, like limiting yourself to only using airport codes, can help release your creativity. You find a totally different outcome.”

Nasser brings his combination of practice and theory into the classroom, resulting in a unique perspective for his students. His practice as a poet, critic and a reviewer feeds directly into the student experience – in 2018, for instance, he coached a team of LBU students who participated in a nationwide performance poetry competition, and now those students are broadening their skills on their own – including putting on a very successful series of readings in Leeds, and publishing pamphlets of their own creative work – and this project will continue to grow in 2018/19.

In the classroom, Nasser says language can break down barriers. "It’s just language, it can be pushed around, and manipulated. There are almost no repercussions. At the start, students may be unsure of themselves, or lack confidence. But, once they recognise they each have something to say, you can break down barriers. Their reluctance is replaced with confidence in themselves and their work. We then can start exploring language and literature together, and ultimately see some incredible results after this amazing three-year journey with them.”

And his graduates, he believes, leave university equipped with the critical, communication and analytical skills that opens up a wide range of career opportunities. “If my students can handle James Joyce, or Gertrude Stein, or Claudia Rankine, they can handle anything. Words are the raw material of culture itself and understanding language gives you a unique skill Humanities students have so much to offer - they are creative, critical thinkers, problem solvers, and great communicators. Studying literature and creative writing provides powerful insights into human behaviour from ethical, social, and intellectual perspectives, and that’s what I try to impart to our students at Leeds Beckett.”

 

Dr Nasser Hussain, Lecturer in English Literature and Creative Writing
School of Cultural Studies & Humanities


Transforming our perspective on autism - "Autism isn't an illness, it's simply a difference" - Dr James McGrath, School of Cultural Studies and Humanities
Those with autism can study the humanities too

Senior lecturer in English and the Humanities, Dr James McGrath, was diagnosed with autism shortly after completing his PhD. James is particularly interested in how literary studies can cross into other disciplines, and has published widely on music as well as poetry. After being diagnosed with autism, James began to focus on the medical humanities. His recent book Naming Adult Autism: Culture, Science, Identity combines academic and creative writing, and experiments with literary criticism of medical texts. He also reviews a range of literary characters in novels, films and poetry that feature autism.

“Many autistic people are encouraged to believe they should only study maths or science. I want to advocate that success in the arts and humanities is also a real possibility if you are autistic,” he said. James’ quest for greater emphasis on humanities approaches to autism have led to the development of a new English module, Literature and Medicine. “The very definition of medicine involves healing and helping. I really believe that literature can be a part of those processes.”

James has read his poems on BBC Radio 3 and discussed his research on BBC Radio 4. He has also written for publications including The Big Issue, The Guardian, The Independent and The Yorkshire Evening Post. He is currently working on a sequence of poems to be titled an autistic figuration, which highlights the relationship between repetition and variation in autistic identities. James said: “Autism isn’t an illness, it’s simply a difference. I am very privileged to have the position I do; I want to inspire others with autism to become lecturers and to believe that they too can study the arts and humanities.”

Dr James McGrath Senior Lecturer in English and the Humanities
School of Cultural Studies & Humanities


Transforming diversity in football: “People from ethnic minorities are excluded from football, on and off the field. I want a game that is more equal, inclusive, and diverse and representative of our society.” - Dr Dan Kilvington
Tackling diversity in football

Dr Dan Kilvington is on a mission: to increase diversity in football at all levels from grassroots to the Premier League. A football fan and lifelong grassroots player, Dan has pursued academic study and research to fulfil his passion for the game. His PhD examined the exclusion of British Asians in football, and the results inspired him to continue that line of research to create positive change. Dan said: “In my PhD I found an almost complete lack of British Asians in football which is just not representative of our diverse society. Because there is a lack of diversity and representation there is a lack of role models which is a barrier to others entering into the game.”

Dan, senior lecturer and course director in media, communication and cultures, is widely published and his research and teaching explores race, sport and new media. He worked with the local organisation for football, the West Riding County FA, to tackle the lack of diversity, creating a new strategy ‘Creating and Developing Coaches’, which has seen him work with over 200 coaches since its inception.

“It’s like speed dating for coaches,” says Dan. “We invite football's key stakeholders along to talk to BAME coaches about opportunities in the region and how to access funding or coaching qualification courses. At the end of the session, new, and significant, networks have been formed." The strategy’s success means Dan is now in demand to roll it out with other organisations around the country. He also provides consultancy for key stakeholders, inclusion charities and anti-racism campaign groups.

“The research I do has helped form strategies which leads to impact and things change because of it. I hope our students find this empowering; I hope they can change things too.”

Dr Dan Kilvington, Course Director in Media, Communication, Cultures
School of Cultural Studies & Humanities


Transforming our self image: "We must stop thinking 'thin' equals good." - Professor Jayne Raisborough - School of cultural Studies & Humanities
Why one size never fits all

To understand what it is to be human, we need to ask some big questions about how society is run, organised and managed and explore how our culture has adapted and developed over time. Jayne Raisborough, Professor of Media at Leeds Beckett, examines how these big ideas get into our imagination, our hearts and belief systems. She is fiercely passionate about challenging the prejudices and stereotypes presented by the media, particularly when it comes to weight and body issues.

"We live in a culture where appearance and body management are perceived as being of paramount importance, with many people increasingly anxious about how their bodies look. I’m both fascinated and appalled at the way that fat bodies are represented by the media, especially on television, and the implications that this has for us all."

Jayne’s research shows that weight stereotyping in the media leads to us developing a very different relationship with our bodies as we become more anxious about our own fat. This can create a whole host of psychological and social problems, including loneliness and bullying, and it has massive implications for how people interact and become members of society. “We must stop thinking ‘thin equals good’ and move towards body positivity and a greater appreciation of different types of body shapes."

Jayne Raisborough, Professor of Media,
School of Cultural Studies & Humanities


Transforming mental health in schools: "The work we do ensures that mental health difficulties at school do not stand in the way of a young person's success in the future." - Professor Jonathan Glazzard, Carnegie School of Education
Positive action to improve mental health in schools

The number of children and young people suffering from mental health issues has surged in recent years, creating a challenge for our schools.

“The pressure now on children in schools has never been greater.” says Jonathan Glazzard, Professor of Teacher Education. “They face the relentless pressure of assessment, which causes stress and anxiety. Social media has also changed the face of bullying; a malicious post can have deep, devastating consequences for the young person on the receiving end.

“Some of our schools are leading the way by making it okay for people to talk about mental health. They are exploring how mental health affects the children, as well as parents and school staff. My view is that, nless we address these issues and promote a positive culture of wellbeing for children, young people and staff in schools, it will have a negative impact on educational attainment.

“We must pay attention to children’s holistic, not just academic, needs. We can prepare them better for living in a socially-inclusive society, where they will encounter difference and diversity and develop relationships with a wide range of people. The work we do at Leeds Beckett is helping to ensure that mental health difficulties do not stand in the way of success at school and beyond.”

Jonathan Glazzard, Professor of Teacher Education
Carnegie School of Education


Transforming tourism: "Tourism is a way of re-creating memories, re-imagining history and constructing our present." - Professor Dorina Maria Buda - School of Events, Tourism & Hospitality Management
Dark tourism and emotions

Besides seeking sun, sand, sea and relaxation, people are increasingly travelling to areas of past and present conflicts, wars and atrocities. This type of travel, known as ‘dark tourism’, attracts visitors who want to experience these locations in an emotional or therapeutic way.

Professor Dorina-Maria Buda researches our emotional attachments to places, particularly places of ongoing socio-political turmoil and conflicts. She argues that visiting places connected to atrocities, death and disasters can promote empathy in the visitor and tie the tourist at a deep level to the place and the event. “I want to understand how emotions create connections as well as disconnections between tourists, visited locals and places.”

These emotions are not always clear-cut, she stresses. Fun is not the opposite of fear, nor is safety necessarily the opposite of danger. “I explore how dynamics of emotions between tourists and local tourism stakeholders shape the identity of places in areas of ongoing socio-political conflict. The focus is on emotions such as awe, anger, fear or fun. I conduct my research in areas of turmoil like Jordan, Israel and Palestine – this means I travel to these places and spend a couple of months per year collecting material, carrying out individual interviews and focus groups with tourists and locals involved in tourism transactions.”

Her findings show that these places hardly ever leave the people who visit them untouched. “In most societies, commemorations of past wars serve different purposes. Visiting places of battles, wars and conflicts reminds us that such atrocious events should not be allowed to ever happen again. This can help us learn from the past. It can also teach us to detect those ideas of religious hostility, racial inferiority and the like that generate violence, wars and conflicts, and to challenge these ideas before they begin to flower and prosper. “Cemeteries, monuments, museums, places of battles and places where a disaster happened are always imbued with an aura of patriotic or historic significance. And these national narratives are reinterpreted through a certain lens of perpetual movement, invading history, travel and tourism. Tourism is a way of recreating memories, ‘re-imagining’ history and constructing our present.”

Dorina-Maria Buda, Professor of Tourism Management
School of Events, Tourism & Hospitality Management


Transforming music: "No-one does a first take like David Bowie" - Kenn Scott - School of Film, Music & Performing Arts
They came from his soul

Ken Scott co-produced the seminal albums Hunky Dory and Ziggy Stardust with David Bowie. He also worked with The Beatles as their sound engineer on Magical Mystery Tour and the White Album.

"There is only one artist I have worked with who could do lead vocals on the first take almost every time. With David [Bowie], it was always there; it was amazing. I think that’s one of the reasons we’re still talking about these albums after all this time. They’re real, they’re human and they come from his soul.”

Ken Scott, Senior Lecturer in Music Production
School of Film, Music & Performing Arts


Transforming dementia care: "Our goal is to help people with dementia and their families experience a better quality of life" - Professor Claire Surr - School of Health and Community Studies
Dementia: Care starts at home

When Professor Claire Surr’s great-grandmother was diagnosed with dementia, it inspired her to pursue research to improve the quality of care available to people with this condition. As an undergraduate, Claire's interest in the study of dementia was also shaped by her inspirational lecturer, who was a leading authority on personcentred dementia care – an innovative approach to care provision at the time. Claire now leads internationally recognised academic research in this area.

"Dementia is the leading cause of disability in older age. It causes more deaths per year in the UK than cancer, cardiovascular disease or stroke, and yet receives only a small amount of research funding. Our health and social care services are also chronically underfunded and are struggling to provide good care to people with dementia."

However, Claire believes that increased funding is only one part of the possible solution to the health and social care challenges we are facing in this country, and she is leading several major studies into how we can improve the lives of those living with dementia. "Supporting people to live well with dementia is not straightforward. Whilst the health service is working to keep people living with dementia in their homes for longer, which is what the majority of those with the condition also want, this is often difficult. Older people may not have family support locally because families today are more dispersed across the country or the globe. The social care people can access in their own homes is often limited to visits as short as 15 minutes, twice a day. I am leading two studies to address some of these issues. The first, the DCM EPIC trial, is a four-year study looking at whether an approach called Dementia Care Mapping (DCM) is effective for helping care home staff provide better care for those with dementia. The second focuses on evaluating the most effective approaches to dementia training and education for the health and social care workforce."

"Ultimately, the intention is for the research to improve dementia care and help people with dementia and their families experience a better quality of life."

Claire Surr Professor of Dementia Studies
School of Health & Community Studies


Transforming law: "We must ensure that our legal education keeps pace with social, economic, technological and political evolution." - Deveral Capps - Leeds Law School / "Well designed law degrees provide a unique skillset that means our students can make a real contribution in a changing world" - Dr Jessica Guth - Leeds Law School-
Law in society

Dr Jessica Guth, Chair of the Association of Law Teachers and Reader in the Leeds Law School at Leeds Beckett University is shaping the way in which law is taught in universities and believes a good legal education should go further.

“A law degree is, and should be, more than just preparing you to be a practitioner. Students learn how to construct arguments, make decisions, evaluate information, question things and communicate effectively. I believe law teachers should enable students to make their minds their own.”

Her view is that a law degree needs to be more than simply vocational. In fact, Jessica's question to potential students of law is more fundamental: “When I ask a student why they want to study law, one answer I get is that they want to make a difference. But how do they really want to make a difference? Of course, having a law degree might make them a good lawyer, but I’d rather our education opened their minds to all of the possibilities and ways in which they can make a difference in the world. Well-designed law degrees provide a unique skill set that means our students can make a real contribution in a changing world.”

Dr Jessica Guth, Reader in Law
Leeds Law School

"The way that our legal services are being delivered is continuing to evolve and at an ever-increasing pace. Whilst we must fiercely protect the rule of law and access to justice for all, we must also foster innovation in our industry and adapt to meet the needs of those who need our services.

"Training a flexible workforce through education is critical to this process, and we must ensure that our legal education keeps pace with social, economic, technological and political evolution."

Deveral Capps, Dean
Leeds Law School


Transforming how we reform lives: "Education is a crucial component of prison life that universities can support" - Dr Bill Davies and Dr Helen Nichols - School of Social Sciences
Pressure on Prisons: education is key

Are UK prisons in crisis? Many argue that increased violence, drug use and high levels of suicide plus overcrowding and a lack of resources are undermining prison safety and opportunities for reform.

Dr Helen Nichols and Dr Bill Davies, Senior Lecturers in Criminology and Co-Leaders of the Prison Research Network (PRisoN) at Leeds Beckett University, are helping to transform UK prisons through the power of education in rehabilitating prisoners. The Learning Together initiative, developed with Cambridge University, takes university classes into high security prisons so that inmates complete a module alongside university students.

Bill: “This model of learning connects all students, enabling them to learn with and from each other through discussion. It breaks down social barriers and creates positive social change. Students can challenge their existing ideas about people from different backgrounds while realising their own potential, and the potential of others.”

Helen adds: “Education is a crucial component of prison life that universities can support. We can really only open minds through learning if we are able to break through obstacles that might appear difficult to overcome. What’s been really impressive about the course is the way people have worked together: it has been really collaborative. The students and prisoners have learnt so much from each other and perspectives have changed: the experience broadens the minds of the students and contributes to the rehabilitation of the prisoners. The opportunity for them to use this to make positive changes in their lives and create better futures after they are released is very powerful.”

Dr Bill Davies and Dr Helen Nichols, Senior Lecturers in Criminology
School of Social Sciences


Transforming conflict resolution: "Global civilian peacekeeping is dependant on empowering and enabling local people" - Dr Rachel Julian - School of Social Sciences
Chasing peace in a modern world

Imagine a world where trained, unarmed people can put an end to armed violence in their own communities. That’s what Dr Rachel Julian – a Reader in Leeds Beckett’s School of Social Sciences – is striving to achieve. Putting an end to violence and resolving conflict peacefully is not a task to be taken lightly, and Rachel’s work in international peace and conflict resolution reflects a commitment that spans 25 years.

A passionate advocate of Unarmed Civilian Peacekeeping, Rachel is committed to establishing how non-governmental organisations around the world show that unarmed, trained people can put an end to violence from people with weapons. She has been working in Myanmar, empowering local people who make peaceful interventions through her project, ‘Raising Silent Voices.’

Rachel says: “The ‘Just War’ theory, which justifies the use of violence to protect innocent human life, dominates the way we go to war and deal with international conflicts and makes assumptions about the nature of the state and humanity. “Theories and practice in non-violence dispute this, showing that non-violence and non-violent action can create long lasting and transformative changes in our lives and in the world.”

Dr Rachel Julian, Reader in Peace Studies
School of Social Sciences


Transforming sports performance: "Our aim is to maximise and athlete's career without compromising their love of sport." - Professor Ben Jones - Carnegie School of Sport
Maximising sporting performance

Professional sport is now recognised as a multibillion pound global industry. Measuring success by performance on the stock market as well as on the pitch now carries a considerable potential human cost for all of the competing athletes.

For Ben Jones, Professor of Sports Physiology & Performance, his challenge is to maximise athletes’ potential and performance without limiting the length of their careers. “The work of sports scientists has never been so important. We want to maximise the athlete’s career without compromising any of their love for their sport or limiting their participation.”

He works closely with the coaches for professional rugby league and union clubs, including Super League champions Leeds Rhinos, Yorkshire Carnegie, Bath Rugby and Wasps, and staff at the Rugby Football League and Rugby Football Union. He brings his scientific knowledge directly on to the training ground. “Our work bridges the gap between academic research and the needs of professional clubs. Our blend of rigorous scientific research with the art of coaching improves the performance and the resilience of the athletes, which in turn benefits the club and, of course, the individual."

Ben Jones, Professor of Sports Physiology & Performance
Carnegie School of Sport


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