Support for international colleagues

Buddy Network for new international colleagues

Our international buddy network has been set up to support people joining the University from overseas. This network aims to make the transition to working in the UK easier by giving you the opportunity to contact a Leeds Beckett colleague who has experienced it themselves and is able to support based on their own real-life experiences.

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Search jobs at Leeds Beckett and start your journey towards a rewarding and nurturing work environment.

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Helpful information for a smooth transition

Home Office guidance

The below Home Office webpage gives you advice on protecting yourself from tricks and scams the Home Office are aware have affected other people with a visa. If you receive an unexpected email, telephone call or letter from someone who claims to be from the Home Office, it may not be genuine. In particular, the Home Office will never contact you to ask for money or your personal details.

Home Office guidance

All workers in the UK pay tax and National Insurance. The amount of income tax you pay depends on how much you earn and tax rate bands are subject to annual change. Tax payments are automatically taken out of the salary paid to you by the University.

Depending on your home country’s tax rules and how long you will be based in the UK, you may also still have to pay tax in your home country. The UK has formed agreements with many countries to ensure that individuals will only have to pay tax in one location, and for countries where no agreement exists, the UK rules ensure individuals do not suffer a double tax charge on their income.

Agreement on rights for Irish nationals

Irish nationals will not be required to apply for settled status. The rights to work, study, access social security and public services will be preserved on a reciprocal basis for UK and Irish nationals.

Find out more about income taxes

National Insurance is the UK’s social security scheme. Paying National Insurance may enable you to qualify for certain benefits and the State Pension. Your contribution will automatically be taken out of your salary.

You will need a National Insurance (NI) number to make sure your National Insurance contributions and tax are recorded against your name only. You will find more information about applying for a NI number on Gov.UK (if you have a Biometric Residence Permit (BRP), you might have a NI number already – it will be printed on the back of your BRP if you do).

Apply for a national insurance number

You can find out more about the UK state pension on Gov.uk. You’ll usually need at least 10 qualifying years of National Insurance contributions (NIC) to get any State Pension.

If you have less than 10 years' UK NIC, you may be able to use your overseas social security contributions to make up the 10 qualifying years needed to get a UK state pension. This is most likely if you have lived or worked in the European Economic Area (EEA), Switzerland or certain countries that have a social security agreement with the UK. For more information and an example of how this works, see Gov.uk.

More information about the University’s occupational pension schemes is available on the HR Pension webpage (colleague access only).

More information on the UK state pension

The Government has launched a 'transition' webpage to provide information for EU citizens in the UK, including information about applying for settled status. There is no fee for EU settled status.

More information about the ID document check app, EU Exit, is available here. You can sign up for email updates from the UK government about the UK's withdrawal from the EU.

Leeds City Council Customer Access Service can provide digital assistance and ID checking through 5 community hubs.  More details can be found here.

Apply for settled status

The following Home Office webpages provide information about British citizenship and EEA permanent residence cards (in some circumstances it is possible to apply for British citizenship immediately after receiving EEA permanent residence documentation).  

Permanent residence information

Home Office guidance

The below Home Office webpage gives you advice on protecting yourself from tricks and scams the Home Office are aware have affected other people with a visa. If you receive an unexpected email, telephone call or letter from someone who claims to be from the Home Office, it may not be genuine. In particular, the Home Office will never contact you to ask for money or your personal details.

All workers in the UK pay tax and National Insurance. The amount of income tax you pay depends on how much you earn and tax rate bands are subject to annual change. Tax payments are automatically taken out of the salary paid to you by the University.

Depending on your home country’s tax rules and how long you will be based in the UK, you may also still have to pay tax in your home country. The UK has formed agreements with many countries to ensure that individuals will only have to pay tax in one location, and for countries where no agreement exists, the UK rules ensure individuals do not suffer a double tax charge on their income.

Agreement on rights for Irish nationals

Irish nationals will not be required to apply for settled status. The rights to work, study, access social security and public services will be preserved on a reciprocal basis for UK and Irish nationals.

National Insurance is the UK’s social security scheme. Paying National Insurance may enable you to qualify for certain benefits and the State Pension. Your contribution will automatically be taken out of your salary.

You will need a National Insurance (NI) number to make sure your National Insurance contributions and tax are recorded against your name only. You will find more information about applying for a NI number on Gov.UK (if you have a Biometric Residence Permit (BRP), you might have a NI number already – it will be printed on the back of your BRP if you do).

You can find out more about the UK state pension on Gov.uk. You’ll usually need at least 10 qualifying years of National Insurance contributions (NIC) to get any State Pension.

If you have less than 10 years' UK NIC, you may be able to use your overseas social security contributions to make up the 10 qualifying years needed to get a UK state pension. This is most likely if you have lived or worked in the European Economic Area (EEA), Switzerland or certain countries that have a social security agreement with the UK. For more information and an example of how this works, see Gov.uk.

More information about the University’s occupational pension schemes is available on the HR Pension webpage (colleague access only).

The Government has launched a 'transition' webpage to provide information for EU citizens in the UK, including information about applying for settled status. There is no fee for EU settled status.

More information about the ID document check app, EU Exit, is available here. You can sign up for email updates from the UK government about the UK's withdrawal from the EU.

Leeds City Council Customer Access Service can provide digital assistance and ID checking through 5 community hubs.  More details can be found here.

The following Home Office webpages provide information about British citizenship and EEA permanent residence cards (in some circumstances it is possible to apply for British citizenship immediately after receiving EEA permanent residence documentation).  

Doe Leeds Beckett offer a loan scheme?

As an employee of Leeds Beckett University, you can access a Leeds Credit Union savings and loan scheme through which you can save a minimum amount from your salary on a monthly basis.  Once a certain level of saving is reached you can apply for a low cost loan of up to five times the amount saved.

For further information please call 0113 2145252 or visit the Leeds Credit Union website. For an application form, please contact Payroll in Leighton G14.