Dr Tanefa Apekey, Senior Lecturer

Dr Tanefa Apekey

Senior Lecturer

Dr Tanefa Apekey is a Senior Lecturer in Nutrition at the Leeds Beckett School of Health and a Registered Nutritionist (Public Health). She worked previously as a Postdoctoral Researcher at the University of Leeds and Lecturer/Senior Lecturer at Leeds Trinity University.

Tanefa’s current research focuses on the development of novel, reliable and comprehensive nutrient composition data for popular multi-ethnic foods in the UK. She has produced a new nutrient composition data of popularly consumed traditional West and North Africa and Caribbean foods in UK. This new data will be added to the UK nutrient database. As part of her research programme on migrant health, this new nutrient database will be used to develop culturally acceptable education programmes on choosing healthy diets and as well as interventions to reduce inequalities in nutrition related disorders in UK migrants.

Current Teaching

Course leader MSc Nutrition in Practice

Placement co-ordinator Module lead for:

  • Research Methods for Nutrition
  • Research and Practice Development
  • Research Methods Statistics and Evaluation
  • Professional and Collaborative Practice

Research Interests

Nutrient database

  • Production of comprehensive nutrient database of popular ethnic foods in UK. This includes popular West and North African and as well as Caribbean foods in UK.

Diet and nutrition survey of UK migrants

  • Use New Nutrient data of ethnic foods to conduct diet and nutrition surveys in UK migrants.
  • Development of culturally appropriate public health initiatives using community engagement module. The aim is to educate and empower individuals to engage in healthy lifestyle.
  • Design and delivery of a wide range of nutrition-related, community-based health invents aimed at educating and raising awareness about diet and health in migrant communities.

Collaborations

  • Trans-discipline collaboration with academics and migrant hubs, focused on the design and delivery of a wide range of nutrition-related, community-based health invents aimed at educating and raising awareness about diet and health, capacity-building for all partners and the development of urgently needed public health policies and interventions that will raise the health profile of UK migrants.
  • Collaboration with colleague at the University of Bristol on systematic reviews and meta-analysis, most of which have been published in reputable international journals.
Dr Tanefa Apekey, Senior Lecturer

Selected Outputs

  • Kunutsor SK; Abbasi A; Apekey TA (In press) Aspartate Aminotransferase – Risk Marker for Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus or Red Herring?. Frontiers in Endocrinology, 5

    https://doi.org/10.3389/fendo.2014.00189

    View Repository Record

  • Ricotti G; Apekey TA; Gatenby L (2015) Factors that influence commitment to breastfeeding: a pilot study. Journal of Health Visiting, 3 (4), pp. 216-223.

    http://www.journalofhealthvisiting.com/cgi-bin/go.pl/library/abstract.html?uid=106742

  • Kunutsor SK; Apekey TA; Van Hemelrijck M; Calori G; Perseghin G (2015) Gamma glutamyltransferase, alanine aminotransferase and risk of cancer: systematic review and meta-analysis. International journal of cancer, 136 (5), pp. 1162-1170.

    https://doi.org/10.1002/ijc.29084

  • Kunutsor SK; Apekey TA; Seddoh D (2014) Gamma glutamyltransferase and metabolic syndrome risk: A systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis. International Journal of Clinical Practice, 69 (1), pp. 136-144.

    https://doi.org/10.1111/ijcp.12507

  • Kunutsor SK; Apekey TA; Khan H (2014) Liver enzymes and risk of cardiovascular disease in the general population: a meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. Atherosclerosis, 236 (1), pp. 7-17.

    https://doi.org/10.1016/j.atherosclerosis.2014.06.006

  • Kunutsor SK; Apekey TA; Seddoh D; Walley J (2014) Liver enzymes and risk of all-cause mortality in general populations: a systematic review and meta-analysis. International journal of epidemiology, 43 (1), pp. 187-201.

    https://doi.org/10.1093/ije/dyt192

  • Kunutsor SK; Apekey TA; Walley J (2013) Liver Aminotransferases and Risk of Incident Type 2 Diabetes: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. American Journal of Epidemiology, 178 (2), pp. 159-171.

    https://doi.org/10.1093/aje/kws469

  • Kunutsor SK; Apekey TA; Walley J; Kain K (2013) Ferritin levels and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: an updated systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective evidence. Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews, 29 (4), pp. 308-318.

    https://doi.org/10.1002/dmrr.2394

  • Kunutsor SK; Apekey TA; Steur M (2013) Vitamin D and risk of future hypertension: meta-analysis of 283,537 participants. European Journal of Epidemiology, 28 (3), pp. 205-221.

    https://doi.org/10.1007/s10654-013-9790-2

  • Apekey TA; Morris AEJ; Fagbemi S; Griffiths GJ (2012) Benefits of moderate-intensity exercise during a calorie-restricted low-fat diet. Health Education Journal, 71 (2), pp. 154-164.

    https://doi.org/10.1177/0017896911398235

  • Apekey TA; McSorley G; Tilling M; Siriwardena AN (2011) Room for improvement? Leadership, innovation culture and uptake of quality improvement methods in general practice. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice, 17 (2), pp. 311-318.

    https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2753.2010.01447.x

  • Dyas JV; Apekey TA; Tilling M; Ørner R; Middleton H; Siriwardena AN (2010) Patients' and clinicians' experiences of consultations in primary care for sleep problems and insomnia: a focus group study. British Journal of General Practice, 60 (574), pp. e180-e200.

    https://doi.org/10.3399/bjgp10x484183

  • Apekey TA; Morris AJE; Fagbemi S; Griffiths GJ (2010) Low‐fat diet: case study of a cardiology patient. Nutrition & Food Science, 40 (2), pp. 235-242.

    https://doi.org/10.1108/00346651011029273

  • Apekey TA; Morris AJE; Fagbemi S; Griffiths GJ (2009) Effects of low‐fat and low‐GI diets on health. Nutrition & Food Science, 39 (6), pp. 663-675.

    https://doi.org/10.1108/00346650911002995