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Jackie Wilkinson


About Jackie Wilkinson

Jackie is a registered dietitian and works alongside colleagues in the Nutrition and Dietetics Group to organise and deliver teaching and assessment to nutrition and dietetics students. She works part time (0.3 wte) on Mondays and Fridays.

Jackie completed her BSc (Hons) Biochemistry and Physiology at the University of Leeds and Postgraduate Diploma in Dietetics at Leeds Polytechnic (now Leeds Beckett University). She worked for ten years in clinical dietetics, nutrition health promotion and full and part time research before joining Leeds Metropolitan University (now Leeds Beckett University). Her research experience includes developing and piloting a nutrition intervention in the homes of families in a deprived area and developing and undertaking feeding studies on human subjects. In addition to running the studies she undertook analysis of plasma metabolites and hormones, and energy content of urine and faeces. She is currently undertaking a Masters in Applied Health Research at the University of York.

Current Teaching

Jackie aims to develop and deliver high quality teaching and assessment that meets the needs of professional bodies and students. Jackie has lead and taught on many modules over her time at Leeds Metropolitan/Beckett University. She has successfully managed recruitment as an admissions tutor for postgraduate and undergraduate dietetics courses.

  • BSc (Hons) Dietetics
  • BSc (Hons) Nutrition
  • PG Diploma in Dietetics
  • MSc Clinical Nutrition
  • Clinical Nutrition - module tutor
  • Nutrition Module
  • Communication Skills
  • Undergraduate and masters' research project supervision

Research Interests

Jackie is currently undertaking research at the University of York on factors predicting weight loss in obese patients undertaking cardiac rehabilitation as part of her MSc in Applied Health Research. It is hoped that this will help identify confounding factors that need to be accounted for when comparing programmes or analysing the effects of weight change on health outcomes in obese cardiac rehabilitation patients.

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