To view this video please enable JavaScript, and consider upgrading to a web browser that supports HTML5 video

Disability Advice

A summary of the services that are here to help you

Register Now

Disability Advice

Plus Icon Who can access support from the Disability Team?

We support students with a wide range of long-term conditions, specific learning difficulties and disabilities including:

  • A specific learning difficulty such as dyslexia, dyspraxia or AD(H)D
  • A mental health condition
  • A physical impairment or mobility issues
  • Deaf or a hearing impairment
  • Blind or a visual impairment
  • A social/communication impairment such as Asperger's syndrome/other autistic spectrum disorder

This list is not exhaustive so please Contact Us if you are not sure if you will be eligible.

Plus Icon Meet the Team
  • Disability Advisers will meet with you to discuss the impact of your condition(s); they will recommend adjustments and support and produce a Reasonable Adjustment Plan (RAP) tailored to meet all aspects of your course requirements. They will explain more about consent to share your information via your RAP with your Course Teams so your adjustments can be implemented.
  • Disability Administrators are here to offer advice and deal with any queries you may have. They process registration forms, consent forms, support you with DSA applications, offer advice on types of evidence, run drop-in’s and so much more.
  • The Support Worker Service will match you to a 1 to 1 Specialist Study Skills Tutor or Specialist Mentor when DSA has been awarded. The team also supports students who may need notetaking, sighted guide and exam support.
  • The Disability Assessment Centre. This is a separate team - they assess students to determine what support they may need from the funding available from DSA. This is called a Study Needs Assessment. They can see both Leeds Beckett students and any other students in the UK.
Plus Icon Confidentiality and Data Protection

How we manage your information
Any information you disclose to us will be treated confidentially and sensitively by the Disability Advice Team. We ask you through the registration process to share your consent on a ‘need to know’ basis because we want to prevent any delay in setting up your support. The consent form explains how we use your information and who we share it with. We never normally share anything without your consent, and you can withdraw your consent at any time.

To read our full consent form, download the Disability Consent Form

There are some exceptional circumstances where we may need to share information without your consent. These include:

  • Where we have reason to believe that you or others are at risk of serious harm
  • Where there is a legal requirement to provide the information
Plus Icon Other Support Services

AccessAble Logo

AccessAble is here to take the chance out of going out. To give you the detailed information you need to work out if a place is going to be accessible to you.Our Detailed Access Guides tells you all about a venue's access

 

Contact Us

Two stick figures talking

Disability Advice Team

0113 81 25831

disabilityadvice@leedsbeckett.ac.uk

COVID-19 -  Information regarding learning support for disabled students            2020-21 

In line with Government and Public Health England guidance for universities to minimise transmission of the virus, the majority of disabled students’ learning support will be delivered online during 2020/21. This includes one-to-one specialist study skills tuition and specialist mentoring, plus note taking and where practicable, study assistant support in most cases. The support will be delivered in the way that works best for the student, e.g. audio and / or video calls, as well as via the University’s Virtual Learning Environment, MyBeckett. We have been operating in this way since the Government lockdown at the end of March and, for most students, it has worked well.

Your course will be delivered via a blend of online and digital learning. Additional on-campus sessions will also be available, with the necessary Covid-19 social distancing and other measures in place. On-campus attendance at these sessions will be optional for the majority of students and the content will be available online for those students that cannot attend; the courses where on-campus attendance is required are listed on the Student Support section of the Coronavirus site.

Where disabled students are required to come onto campus, e.g. for practical, lab-based sessions, and need support to access this, e.g. a BSL interpreter, a sighted guide or practical support, Disability Advice is working with the student, specialist providers, the course team and our Health and Safety Team to develop bespoke solutions which comply with COVID -19-secure measures.


If you have any queries or concerns at all, please do contact us – our details are on the Contact Us tab.

Registering with Disability Advice

Two stick figures talking

It is important that you register with us as soon as possible so we can begin organising your support before your studies begin.

What happens when you register

You will be guided step-by-step through our easy to complete registration process. We call this process the Disability Registration Checklist you can check back at any time to see what is complete, what’s in progress and what is left to do:

  1. Complete our registration form and upload evidence of your disability. Please see the 'DSA' tab for more information on types of evidence.
  2. Complete our consent form.
  3. Your form will be processed, and we will send you a link to book a Disability Adviser Appointment.
  4. When you meet with your Adviser, they will produce a Reasonable Adjustment Plan which outlines the adjustments you will need to support you whilst you’re studying with us.

COVID-19 -  Information regarding learning support for disabled students            2020-21 

In line with Government and Public Health England guidance for universities to minimise transmission of the virus, the majority of disabled students’ learning support will be delivered online during 2020/21. This includes one-to-one specialist study skills tuition and specialist mentoring, plus note taking and where practicable, study assistant support in most cases. The support will be delivered in the way that works best for the student, e.g. audio and / or video calls, as well as via the University’s Virtual Learning Environment, MyBeckett. We have been operating in this way since the Government lockdown at the end of March and, for most students, it has worked well.

Your course will be delivered via a blend of online and digital learning. Additional on-campus sessions will also be available, with the necessary Covid-19 social distancing and other measures in place. On-campus attendance at these sessions will be optional for the majority of students and the content will be available online for those students that cannot attend; the courses where on-campus attendance is required are listed on the Student Support section of the Coronavirus site.

Where disabled students are required to come onto campus, e.g. for practical, lab-based sessions, and need support to access this, e.g. a BSL interpreter, a sighted guide or practical support, Disability Advice is working with the student, specialist providers, the course team and our Health and Safety Team to develop bespoke solutions which comply with COVID -19-secure measures.


If you have any queries or concerns at all, please do contact us – our details are on the Contact Us tab.

Individual Support

Plus Icon What to Expect when you meet with a Disability Adviser?

You will have an individual appointment with a Disability Adviser to discuss how your condition impacts you day-to-day and, in particular, how it may impact on your learning. We will discuss the types of adjustments and support we can put in place to enable you to participate fully in your studies. We then write this up and share it with you as a Reasonable Adjustment Plan (RAP). We will also tell you about other services and support you may benefit from, both within the University and specialist external support. We will explain more about consent and why and how information about your disability will be shared. Then, when you have confirmed your consent, the Reasonable Adjustment Plan will be shared with your course team and any other university departments, such as Timetabling, who need to know to ensure that all aspects of University life are accessible to you.

Registering with Disability Advice and meeting a Disability Adviser to draw up a Reasonable Adjustment Plan is essential to access adjustments and support on your course.

Plus Icon What is a Reasonable Adjustment Plan?

A Reasonable Adjustment Plan is a formal document which aims to outline any study related challenges you may experience, and detail tailored support based on your individual requirements.

This document is produced in consultation with a Disability Adviser and shared, with your consent and on a ‘need to know basis’, with your course team and other relevant university departments/services, so that university life can become more accessible to you.

The Reasonable Adjustment Plan will include advice for both you and staff at Leeds Beckett.

We understand that the support you need may change over time depending on any fluctuations of your disability/long term condition(s) or alterations to teaching and assessment methods. You can contact us to review your support at any time.

Plus Icon What does a Reasonable Adjustment Plan include?

The following are examples of the sort of thing that may be included in a Reasonable Adjustment Plan:

  • Exam or assessment adjustments (e.g. extra time, use of a PC, alternative room, etc.)
  • Access to handouts and notes in advance of taught sessions
  • Additional support from your tutors (e.g. assistance to catch up on missed work or to check your understanding, as required)
  • Permission to record taught sessions (see Guidance) guidance needs reviewing, if not being recorded as standard
  • Extended library book loans, additional reservations, book collection
  • Personal emergency evacuation plans (PEEP)
  • Adjustable / ergonomic furniture in taught sessions
Plus Icon Exam Adjustment

Adjustments for end of semester exams need to be in place in advance of the start of the exam cycle and can only be recommended by the Disability Advice team. It is essential that you provide evidence of your disability and contact us to discuss exam adjustments before the dates below:

  • Friday 6th November 2020 for the January 2021 examinations
  • Friday 5th March 2021 for the May 2021 examinations

Frequently Asked Questions

Plus Icon I had exam adjustments at school - will these arrangements be in place for my university exams?

To access adjustments in your University examinations you need to contact the Disability Advice team to register with the service and provide evidence of the support you’ve received before.

Plus Icon Will other students know I have a Reasonable Adjustment Plan?

Your Reasonable Adjustment Plan is confidential and only shared on a ‘need to know’ basis with your course team and other university services such as Accommodation, Library, Health and Safety to implement support and reasonable adjustments. Your fellow students will not be made aware that you have a Reasonable Adjustment Plan or the contents unless you choose to share that information yourself.

Plus Icon What happens if I need to make changes to my Reasonable Adjustment Plan?

If you want to make changes to your Reasonable Adjustment Plan at any time during your course, for example if there are any changes to your disability or the reasonable adjustments are not meeting your needs, then you should make an appointment with your Disability Adviser. Please contact the Disability Advice team at disabilityadvice@leedsbeckett.ac.uk or call 0113 81 25831.

Plus Icon Will my course tutors know about my disability?

Once your Reasonable Adjustment Plan has been completed and you have given consent to share, the Reasonable Adjustment Plan document will be emailed to your course director and course administrator. They will share the Reasonable Adjustment Plan with your module tutors.

You do not need to provide your course tutors with a copy of the Reasonable Adjustment Plan because they will have access to it, but please do approach them if there are any support or adjustment recommendations that you want to discuss.

Plus Icon What should I do if I am not getting the support included in my RAP?

If the support in your Reasonable Adjustment Plan is not in place or your needs are not being met, you should discuss this with your Academic Adviser in the first instance; if you are still having difficulties, contact your Disability Adviser who will be able to support you.

Plus Icon I have a blue badge - can I park on campus?

Students who have a Blue Badge can park in designated disabled bays within our University car parks. You will need a permit and barrier fob to access the car park(s).

Apply for a parking permit here and click ‘register.’

You need to register and complete the form (selecting “student disability – blue badge” from the permit choices). Our Security team will process your application and send the permit and barrier fob out to you.

Plus Icon I think I have dyslexia but have not been tested - can I get support?

If you think you may have a specific learning difficulty, such as dyslexia, we would firstly recommend you complete QuickScan. QuickScan is an online screening tool that highlights your preferred learning style and any indications of dyslexia or dyspraxia. If QuickScan shows any indications of a specific learning difficulty, Disability Advice can help you arrange an assessment with an Educational Psychologist for a full diagnostic assessment to test for this. Please email disabilityadvice@leedsbeckett.ac.uk to arrange this.

Plus Icon Who should I contact if I am struggling with my course?
If you are struggling with your course as a result of your disability, please contact your Disability Adviser who will be able to support you in the first instance.
Plus Icon I need more time to complete assignments – can I get an extension?

You can apply for an extension by completing the online mitigation and extension form; if the reason you need extra time is related to your disability, you can use your Reasonable Adjustment Plan as evidence.

Plus Icon Are there any support groups that I can join?

Leeds Beckett Students’ Union has many clubs and societies that students can join, offering social opportunities in a more structured way. You may also find this link useful if you want to meet new people: www.citysocializer.com.

For autistic students we run a social group called Spectrum. Attendance is flexible, so you can come to every group meeting or only occasionally when it suits you. You don’t need to book, just turn up! Spectrum - Times, Dates and Locations.

Plus Icon I have to contribute £200 towards my DSA funded computer, can the university cover this?

Student Money and Advice have set up a fund to assist those students who may struggle to pay the £200 contribution towards the DSA computer. You may be eligible to apply, if your household income is less than £25,000 per annum and you are in receipt of the full maintenance loan.

If you think you are eligible and have received a copy of your DSA award letter, complete the brief online application form.

Disabled Students’ Allowances (DSAs)

Plus Icon What are Disabled Students Allowances
DSA is a government fund to cover the extra costs of studying at University related to your disability or long-term health condition in addition to the support that the University provides.
 We encourage you to apply as soon as possible to ensure support is in place for the start of your studies, as the process can take as long as 14 weeks.  You can also apply at any time during your studies. 
 

Watch this short video about DSAs:

 

The following are examples of the type of support that can be funded by Disabled Students’ Allowances (DSA).  Any recommendations will be discussed in a Study Needs Assessment and are based on your individual study related needs and personal requirements. Types of support you may receive include:

  • Specialist Equipment
  • 1 to 1 Support
  • Travel
  • General Allowance
Specialist equipment
• Assistive software, such as mind-mapping, text-to-speech, speech recognition 
• Laptop - when this is recommended students contribute £200 
• Ergonomic furniture and equipment, such a chair, desk, specialist keyboard and mouse 

Non-Medical Helpers (NMH) – 1 to 1 Support
• Specialist 1:1 study skills support 
• Specialist mentor 
• Specialist note taker if you have a hearing or visual impairment 
• BSL interpreters / communication support workers 
• Sighted guides 
• Mobility training 

Travel  
• Contribution towards the cost of taxis for students unable to access campus or placement using public transport  
• Contribution towards the cost of petrol for students reliant on using their own vehicle to access campus or placement 

General Allowance
•Contribution towards the cost of printing and photocopying, or printer ink and paper if you have a printer
Plus Icon How to apply

You can apply for DSAs when you apply for student finance online.

There is a section on the form about applying for DSA. Depending on where you come from, you will need to apply to the correct funding body (see links below).

Plus Icon Evidence Needed

When you apply for DSAs you will be asked to attach evidence of your disability or long-term health condition.

 

ConditionFor a Disability or long-term health condition (e.g. a sensory impairment, diabetes, epilepsy, HIV etc)

Evidence neededA copy of a report or letter from your doctor or consultant (showing a duration of 1 year or more).

If I don't have any evidence: Ask your doctor/consultant to complete this DSA evidence form

 

Condition: A mental health condition

Evidence needed: A copy of a report or letter from your doctor or consultant (showing a duration of 1 year or more).

If I don't have any evidence: Ask your doctor/consultant to complete this DSA evidence form

 

Condition: An Autism Spectrum Condition or ADHD/ADD

Evidence needed: A copy of a report or letter from your doctor or consultant (showing a duration of 1 year or more).
 
If I don't have any evidence: You can apply for a diagnostic assessment funded by the University. Contact disabilityadvice@leedsbeckett.ac.uk for more information.

 

Condition: A specific learning difficulty e.g. dyslexia/dyspraxia

Evidence needed: A copy of a 'diagnostic assessment' from a practitioner, psychologist, or suitably qualified specialist teacher.

If I don't have any evidence: You can apply for a diagnostic assessment funded by the University. 

 

You will receive a letter confirming that you are eligible for DSAs and you will be asked to book a Study Needs Assessment.  Leeds Beckett has a Disability Assessment Centre at both campuses - Priestley Hall at Headingley Campus and Calverley Building at our City Campus.  

There are Assessment Centres all over the country and you find these on the link in the letter that was sent from your funding body.
 
Plus Icon What happens at a Study Needs Assessment
Your Assessor will discuss with you in detail the impact your condition has on your studies and talk to you about the specialist equipment, assistive software and support available to you at University.

We know that a person's disability can affect them in different ways and so your views are a very important part of the process to ensure that the recommended support is tailored to you.  
 

The DSA Steps:
1. Apply for Disabled Students’ Allowances
Begin your application. A response from the funding body could take up to 6 weeks. 
2. Book your Study Needs Assessment.
Leeds Beckett has a Disability Assessment Centre; you can contact them by emailing dac@leedsbeckett.ac.uk or calling 0113 823357. There are also other Centres across the country.
3. Book your NMH support and specialist equipment if recommended in your award letter from your funding body. 
See example of an award letter
We can help with this if you’re unsure what you need to do.  The whole process can take up to 14 weeks so don’t delay and apply now for DSA!

 

Frequently Asked Questions -  Applying for DSA

Plus Icon What are the benefits of receiving DSA?
DSA gives you lots of additional benefits that are important for your studies. Watch a short video about DSAs to see the benefits you can have. You can check your eligibility and begin your DSA application.
Plus Icon How long will the DSA process take?
The DSA process takes around 14 weeks from your application to receiving your equipment/support. 
Plus Icon Can anyone help me complete the DSA application form?
You can contact a member of the Disability Advice team who will be able to help you complete DSA application. You can either email us at disabilityadvice@leedsbeckett.ac.uk and attach a copy of your application or you can bring your application to one of our drop-in sessions.
Plus Icon I have received a letter saying I am eligible for DSA. What do I need to do next?

Once you have received an email or letter informing you that you are eligible for DSA you will need to book and attend a needs assessment.

Find your nearest assessment centre.

If you would like to arrange an assessment with Leeds Beckett assessment centre, please email dac@leedsbeckett.ac.uk

Frequently Asked Questions - After DSA is approved

Plus Icon How do I set up my NMH support?
If you have given Student Finance consent to share, then the University will receive a copy of your letter and they will contact you.  But if you prefer to organise this straight away, contact supportworkerservice@leedsbeckett.ac.uk and the team will set this up for you. If you have NMH support with another supplier, you will need to contact them using the details provided on your DSA eligibility letter.
Plus Icon How do I get my equipment/assistive technology training?
Student Finance will email you a letter approving your DSA. On page 2 it will give you the name of the supplier, their telephone number and email.  You will need to contact the suppliers directly to arrange delivery of your equipment and your assistive technology training sessions. You will be able to find this information and the contact details for the suppliers on your DSA eligibility letter. They will need a copy of your letter and your contact details.
Plus Icon I can’t pay £200 contribution for the laptop. Is there any assistance available?

Our Student Money and Advice service have a fund to assist those students who may struggle to pay the £200 contribution. 

You may be eligible to apply if your household income is less than £25,000 per annum and you are in receipt of the full student finance loan.

Log onto MyHub and answer a few simple questions to find out if you are eligible.

 
Plus Icon What do I need to do if I am a part time or postgraduate student? (re applying each year)

You will need to apply for DSA every year if you: 

• are a postgraduate student 
• are a part-time student 
• only get DSA funding (i.e. no tuition fees/maintenance loan etc.) 

You don’t need to provide medical evidence and ID every year if you’re continuing on the same course at the same university or college.

 
Plus Icon Feedback
These are some of the things our students having been saying about our 1 to 1 tutor support
 
"I couldn't have got to where I have in my degree without my Study Skills Tutor, Matt Flint. He has been wonderful supporting me and having patience with me. He goes above and beyond to make sure I understand things better, which is a hard task to do with me being autistic. I know what tasks I am aiming towards for each semester. If ever I have an issue or question, he sorts it out and gets back to me ASAP."

"I am highly satisfied with the service Disability Advice has given me throughout university."

"I have just had my first Study Skills session with Margo. I cannot tell you what a difference this has made, she is amazing!"

"The open communication with my support via email and scheduled meetings helps me organise and prioritise my subjects. Furthermore, I couldn't have gotten a more supportive staff as them."

COVID-19 -  Information regarding learning support for disabled students            2020-21 

In line with Government and Public Health England guidance for universities to minimise transmission of the virus, the majority of disabled students’ learning support will be delivered online during 2020/21. This includes one-to-one specialist study skills tuition and specialist mentoring, plus note taking and where practicable, study assistant support in most cases. The support will be delivered in the way that works best for the student, e.g. audio and / or video calls, as well as via the University’s Virtual Learning Environment, MyBeckett. We have been operating in this way since the Government lockdown at the end of March and, for most students, it has worked well.

Your course will be delivered via a blend of online and digital learning. Additional on-campus sessions will also be available, with the necessary Covid-19 social distancing and other measures in place. On-campus attendance at these sessions will be optional for the majority of students and the content will be available online for those students that cannot attend; the courses where on-campus attendance is required are listed on the Student Support section of the Coronavirus site.

Where disabled students are required to come onto campus, e.g. for practical, lab-based sessions, and need support to access this, e.g. a BSL interpreter, a sighted guide or practical support, Disability Advice is working with the student, specialist providers, the course team and our Health and Safety Team to develop bespoke solutions which comply with COVID -19-secure measures.


If you have any queries or concerns at all, please do contact us – our details are on the Contact Us tab.

Learning Support and Resources




Disability Support Worker Service

The role of the Support Worker Service is to coordinate Non-Medical Helper (NMH) support for disabled students.  NMH support is recommended through your Study Needs Assessment and is confirmed when you receive your Disabled Students’ Allowances (DSA) letter. See an example of this letter.  When the Service receives this letter, they will allocate a Study Skills Tutor or Specialist Mentor to support you. You will normally see them on a 1 to 1 weekly basis. This is why we encourage you to apply for DSA.

Benefits of NMH Support

Plus Icon How specialist mentoring can help you with your studies
Specialist Mentors support students with a mental health condition or autistic spectrum condition.
A Specialist Mentor will support you to achieve your full potential at university by working with you to develop strategies and identify tools which mitigate the impact of your condition and enable you to achieve your full potential.

All our mentors have a professional psychological or other relevant background; their training and skills will inform the way that they work with you.

Support may involve
• Help with motivation
• Time management and planning
• Advice and support with learning strategies
• Managing expectations about appropriate levels of study.
• Coping skills and confidence building
• Mental health self-help and self-management skills
• Identifying strategies tom minimise the impact of your condition on your studies
• Identifying stressors
• A level of emotional support to help you engage with the learning and social aspects of University life
A Specialist Mentor is not a therapist or counsellor, neither are they subject specialists. Their role is to support you develop as an independent learner and maintain the necessary focus on academic progress.
 
Plus Icon How Study Skills Tuition can help you with your studies

Specialist Study Skills Tutors support students who: 
• Have a Specific Learning Difficulty (SpLD), such as dyslexia, dyspraxia, dyscalculia, dysgraphia; or
• Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD); or
• Have an Autism Spectrum Condition

Tutors can support you to develop strategies on how to approach some or all of the following:

• Grammar, spelling and punctuation
• Academic writing skills and essay structure
• Revision schedules and strategies
• Proofreading strategies and referencing
• Research and resource management
• Developing presentations
• Note-taking and reading strategies
• Improving your self-confidence
• Prioritising tasks and managing time effectively
• Developing skills in planning and organising 

The aim is that the strategies and skills you develop when working with your tutor will be useful not only during your time at university, but also beyond as these are life skills which will help you in the workplace and life in general. 

Tutors do not provide ‘subject specific’ support but rather aim to enable you to develop strategies for academic study.  For example, a tutor will not teach you core elements of your course content but will work with you on ways to structure your essay and suggest methods of researching your topic.  Tutors do not provide a proofreading service; instead, they can help you to improve your own reviewing and editing skills.

Please watch our video on how Study Skills support can support you in your studies;

[Video created by Elaine Doffman.]

 
Plus Icon Other types of NMH Support
Other types of support we can provide where recommended by a Disability Adviser include:
• Practical Support/Library Support
• Exam Support – Reader/Scribe
• Note-taker
• Sighted Guide
• Study Assistant
 
Plus Icon Self-access resources
Our team of Specialist Study Skills Tutors and Mentors have developed a wide range of resources that can help you with your studies, including:  

• Critical thinking
• Glossary of academic terms
• Notetaking methods
• Reading SQ3R
• Decoding assignments
• Punctuation
• Time Management
• How to write paragraphs
• How to reference 
• How to write a literature review
• How to write a dissertation/proposal

The below resources are designed to support you through your studies. If you have any further questions, contact Disability Advice on disabilityadvice@leedsbeckett.ac.uk
 

Assessment Information

Decoding Assignments

Essay Writing - Introductions and Conclusions

Essay Writing - Writing the main body of your essay

Feedback on Assessments

Finding key contact information

Key and recommended reading

Structuring paragraphs in reflective writing

Making use of the module handbook

Plus Icon Support Workers are not able to:

• Provide personal care
• Provide any academic guidance
• Comment on or decide what you read or write
• Carry, push or lift equipment (beyond, with their agreement, a laptop, books or written materials), including a wheelchair
• Exceed the level of support that has been agreed
• Be available without adequate notice

Support Workers have strict professional role boundaries. The roles do not usually extend to working off-campus face to face with students or engaging in non-academic social situations. If there is any deviation from these boundaries, they must be agreed in advance with the Disability Adviser.

Support Workers cannot negotiate with an academic, school or department on behalf of the student or attend meetings without the express agreement of the student’s Disability Adviser.

 
Plus Icon Feedback received about NMH Support

 From a dyslexic student – “Just wanted to say I’ve been reading back on assignments I have done before I started receiving support and it’s fair to say that there is a significant improvement in the language and sentence structure I am using now”.



 From an autistic student - “I have been informed I can give praise to members of your staff. Therefore, I would like acknowledgement toward Matthew Flint! I couldn't have got to where I have in my degree without him, he has been wonderful supporting me and having patience with me. He goes above and beyond to make sure I understand things better, which is a hard task to do with me being autistic alongside his timetables he creates so I know what tasks I am aiming towards for each semester. If ever I have an issue or questions, he sorts it out and gets back to me ASAP. He deserves a pay rise!”

 
Plus Icon What if your NMH support is not working for you?
• In the first instance, we advise that you discuss any issues with your support worker. They will be able to amend their working practices or priorities, so the support suits you better. Many issues can be overcome through discussion.

• If this does not resolve the matter, or if you do not feel comfortable raising an issue, please speak to the Support Worker Service.

• It is possible for you to be allocated to a different support worker where something really isn’t working for you, although this option should always be considered really carefully, as mutual confidence and rapport between you and your support worker builds up over time.  All our support workers have the skills and experience required to perform their role.
 

Access to further support:

Hit The Books! workshops

Struggling to get motivated to do your work? Kick start your learning with a Hit The Books! workshop.

Hit The Books! is a virtual learning space designed to help you focus on your own work, working at your own pace to achieve your goals.

How does it work?

We begin with a focusing exercise and a chance to set some study goals. Then, using the Pomodoro method of study, we provide four 20-minute study blocks with micro breaks between each block. You can choose to come for either two or the four study blocks.

When?

Every Tuesday and Thursday from 12.00 - 14.00 (term-time only). To book onto a workshop, visit the Disability Advice Events page.

If you experience any difficulties booking a space, please contact S.Azam@leedsbeckett.ac.uk

Skills for Learning
We also recommend you look at the Skills for Learning website.  Skills for Learning is a collection of resources to support the learning and teaching of academic skills.
Assistive Technology and Software

If you need specialist assistive technology and software to help with your studies, we've got a range of products and training to meet your needs.  There is a range of assistive software available in the Library for all students to use. 

There are Disability Resource Areas for the exclusive use of disabled students in the libraries at both our campuses.

 

How To Contact Us

Two stick figures talking

The Disability Advice Team

Email: disabilityadvice@leedsbeckett.ac.uk
Tel: 0113 81 25831
Location: Priestley Hall, Headingley Campus
Rose Bowl, City Campus

Two stick figures talking

The Support Worker Service 

Email: supportworkerservice@leedsbeckett.ac.uk
Tel: 0113 81 25660
Location: Priestley Hall, Headingley Campus
Rose Bowl, City Campus

If are phone lines are busy and you’re struggling to get through to us why not use our call back form and we’ll aim to get back to you within 24 hours.

Two stick figures talking

The Disability Assessment Centre

Email: dac@leedsbeckett.ac.uk
Tel: 0113 81 23357
Location: CL118, Calverley Building, City Campus
G07a, Priestley Hall, Headingley Campus

 

Opening Times:
Monday to Friday  - 9.00am to 5.00pm

 

For Study Needs Assessors / NMH Rates

Information to assist Study Needs Assessors

 

Lecture Capture

Leeds Beckett University has lecture capture facilities in teaching spaces that are utilised by some staff on an ‘opt in’ basis.  There are no lecture capture facilities available in other study spaces, for example, group study rooms, tutorial rooms.

In 2020/21, academic delivery will be a blend of online and on campus learning; all online sessions will be recorded.

 

Course Information

For more information about individual courses, please see our course handbooks.

 

Software

Leeds Beckett University can provide our students with free downloads of MS Office 365. We also have a range of assistive software available on campus.

If you have any queries please contact disabilityadvice@leedsbeckett.ac.uk.

Leeds Beckett University - NMH Rates


Download our guide to our NMH Rates