BA (Hons)

English with Creative Writing

Teaching & Learning

Combine your love of reading and the study of literary texts with creative writing practice. You will develop skills in research, critical analysis, and oral and written communication while you progress your own writing style. The tabs below detail what and how you will study in each year of your course. The balance of assessments and overall workload will be informed by your core modules and the option modules you choose to study – the information provided is an indication of what you can expect and may be subject to change. The option modules listed are also an indication of what will be available to you. Their availability is subject to demand and you will be advised which option modules you can choose at the beginning of each year of study.

Due to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic we are currently unable to advise on the mode of teaching for September 2021, however we will keep you updated and provide more information as soon as we can. We continue to follow government guidance and your teaching and learning will reflect the restrictions in place at the time of delivery. We currently anticipate that you may experience a blended approach – this is a mix of face-to-face, on campus and online teaching and learning. You can keep up to date with teaching and learning at Leeds Beckett via our Covid-19 website. Updated course specifications will be available in August 2021. In the meantime, our existing course specifications are available.

What you'll learn

This module will support you as you start to work at degree level and develop strategies for the interpretation of contemporary literary texts. You will engage with a range of post-millennial texts that seek to problematize the contemporary period. You teaching will focus on literary innovations and ways in which texts interact with techniques, approaches and debates in literary studies today. Your learning will explore a range of critical approaches through a number of set texts to help you develop key skills that will inform your work at degree level.
Gain an introduction to the practices and processes of creative writing. Your studies will draw on examples from literary and digital texts, and you will begin to develop an understanding of the contexts of their production and reception. You will begin to use your initiative, creative response and collaborative working in a workshop setting to underpin your creative writing throughout the programme.
Develops your critical-thinking skills and your ability to interpret literary texts. You will explore major theoretical approaches to the study of literature using extracts from theorists' work and supporting resources.
Study an extended range of forms that could include dramatic monologues and short scripts. You will study fundamental theoretical principles and debates such as narrative, voice and object that relate to writing practices, and you will start to explore and experiment with your own writing.
Study a wide variety of poetry written in English and gain an understanding of the development of poetry from the Shakespearean period through to contemporary times. You will be better acquainted with a range of poetry in order to develop your sense of literary history. You will study critical and theoretical perspectives and interpretive tools to enable you to approach the reading and analysis of poetry with confidence.
Study comic drama produced in the period from the Renaissance to the Restoration. This module will provide a framework through which these texts can be interpreted and understood in relation to the historical moments in which they were produced. You will explore the relationship between the comedies and aspects of elite and popular cultures, and you will consider the relationship of these plays to the practices of carnival, festive and masquerade in early modern England.
This module will support you as you start to work at degree level and develop strategies for the interpretation of contemporary literary texts. You will engage with a range of post-millennial texts that seek to problematize the contemporary period. You teaching will focus on literary innovations and ways in which texts interact with techniques, approaches and debates in literary studies today. Your learning will explore a range of critical approaches through a number of set texts to help you develop key skills that will inform your work at degree level.
Gain an introduction to the practices and processes of creative writing. Your studies will draw on examples from literary and digital texts, and you will begin to develop an understanding of the contexts of their production and reception. You will begin to use your initiative, creative response and collaborative working in a workshop setting to underpin your creative writing throughout the programme.
Develops your critical-thinking skills and your ability to interpret literary texts. You will explore major theoretical approaches to the study of literature using extracts from theorists' work and supporting resources.
Study an extended range of forms that could include dramatic monologues and short scripts. You will study fundamental theoretical principles and debates such as narrative, voice and object that relate to writing practices, and you will start to explore and experiment with your own writing.
Study a wide variety of poetry written in English and gain an understanding of the development of poetry from the Shakespearean period through to contemporary times. You will be better acquainted with a range of poetry in order to develop your sense of literary history. You will study critical and theoretical perspectives and interpretive tools to enable you to approach the reading and analysis of poetry with confidence.
Study comic drama produced in the period from the Renaissance to the Restoration. This module will provide a framework through which these texts can be interpreted and understood in relation to the historical moments in which they were produced. You will explore the relationship between the comedies and aspects of elite and popular cultures, and you will consider the relationship of these plays to the practices of carnival, festive and masquerade in early modern England.

What you'll learn

Explore the emergence and development of the Romantic movement in Britain between 1780 and 1830 through engaging with a range of literature across a wide cultural and historical spectrum. You will analyse Romanticism using theoretical and critical methods.
Gain an understanding of `postcolonial? literature and the conceptual and critical vocabulary you will need to read and analyse texts from formerly colonised regions of the world.
Explore key aspects of characterisation, story world-building and fictionalisation and build on your year one learning. You will respond to a range of contemporary authors from different cultures to produce your own short stories or extracts from longer works in progress. You will study and practise key aspects of narrative craft such as characterisation, dialogue, dramatisation, point of view and story architecture and understand how these are deployed in both short stories and novels/novellas.
Develop critical and interpretative skills informed by an understanding of the role theory plays in literary studies. This module will enable you to become more confident and more adventurous in your study of literature.
Study poetic voice and audience, and the relationship between them. You will extend your knowledge of contemporary poetry and you will be encouraged to identify potential audiences for your work and start to situate it within a wider literary world.
Explore the emergence and development of the Romantic movement in Britain between 1780 and 1830 through engaging with a range of literature across a wide cultural and historical spectrum. You will analyse Romanticism using theoretical and critical methods.
Gain an understanding of `postcolonial? literature and the conceptual and critical vocabulary you will need to read and analyse texts from formerly colonised regions of the world.
Explore key aspects of characterisation, story world-building and fictionalisation and build on your year one learning. You will respond to a range of contemporary authors from different cultures to produce your own short stories or extracts from longer works in progress. You will study and practise key aspects of narrative craft such as characterisation, dialogue, dramatisation, point of view and story architecture and understand how these are deployed in both short stories and novels/novellas.
Develop critical and interpretative skills informed by an understanding of the role theory plays in literary studies. This module will enable you to become more confident and more adventurous in your study of literature.
Study poetic voice and audience, and the relationship between them. You will extend your knowledge of contemporary poetry and you will be encouraged to identify potential audiences for your work and start to situate it within a wider literary world.

Option modules may include

Explore issues of context - what it is, where it comes from and what its relation is to other forms of information. You will develop strong research skills by taking a theoretically informed approach to contextual study of literature.
Study a selection of literature of the 20th century and examine how literature writes about some of the key events of the for example as WWI, WWII, post-war austerity and the Cold War. You will understand key terms such as modernism and postmodernism. You will consider texts that focus on the idea of alienation and dystopia and the place of the individual in society and explore why writers of the period turned to imagining the future in order to express their concerns with their present moments. In preparation for writing your dissertation, you will be guided through the process of developing your own research question to become a more independent learner.
Understand the way that humanities disciplines and skills intersect with a range of professional working contexts. You will complete 36 hours of live-brief learning to gain first-hand experience of planning, delivery and evaluating a professional working brief set by an industry partner organisation. You will work as a group across 10 weeks alongside a tutor to design, deliver, present and evaluate the brief to industry standards. As well as conducting a reflective case study of your brief, you will complete a CV, cover letter, LinkedIn profile and undertake a recorded mock interview.
Explore issues of context - what it is, where it comes from and what its relation is to other forms of information. You will develop strong research skills by taking a theoretically informed approach to contextual study of literature.
Study a selection of literature of the 20th century and examine how literature writes about some of the key events of the for example as WWI, WWII, post-war austerity and the Cold War. You will understand key terms such as modernism and postmodernism. You will consider texts that focus on the idea of alienation and dystopia and the place of the individual in society and explore why writers of the period turned to imagining the future in order to express their concerns with their present moments. In preparation for writing your dissertation, you will be guided through the process of developing your own research question to become a more independent learner.
Understand the way that humanities disciplines and skills intersect with a range of professional working contexts. You will complete 36 hours of live-brief learning to gain first-hand experience of planning, delivery and evaluating a professional working brief set by an industry partner organisation. You will work as a group across 10 weeks alongside a tutor to design, deliver, present and evaluate the brief to industry standards. As well as conducting a reflective case study of your brief, you will complete a CV, cover letter, LinkedIn profile and undertake a recorded mock interview.

What you'll learn

You will choose to complete a dissertation an extended study on a topic of interest to you, or a sustained creative writing practice project. Whichever option you choose, you will complete the module over two semesters overseen by a designated tutor.
You will choose to complete a dissertation an extended study on a topic of interest to you, or a sustained creative writing practice project. Whichever option you choose, you will complete the module over two semesters overseen by a designated tutor.

Option modules may include

Examine a body of reading, thought, and practice in contemporary writing loosely understood as `avant-garde? or experimental writing. Given the renegade nature of these works, we will move away from using such generic categories as poetry or prose, even as we try to understand how these texts usefully extend and interrogate precisely those categories. Through a programme of close reading, in-class and online discussion, and independent study, you will critically and creatively engage with a rich tradition of contemporary literary practice.
This module will focus on the craft of writing drama for stage and audio (radio or podcast). It will introduce you to the foundations of scriptwriting for theatre and live performance. You'll be encouraged to consider the requirements of form and audience in each dramatic context - whether for live theatre, site specific performance or broadcast drama.
By reflecting on learning acquired through work placements, this module will focus on promoting self-awareness of your ‘career story’. You will look at how you evaluate your current skills, explore the future possibilities in your career development and navigate pathways through those chosen possibilities. This module will enable you to become ‘cartographer’ of your own future experience. You will embark upon a minimum of 80 hours work placement, supported by reflective exercises, and build expertise and confidence through a range of assessments designed by the course team and employer partners. Conceptualised and designed by digital specialists, the module is purposefully created to be delivered and experienced online – reflecting the increasingly distributed nature of work communications and embracing digital environments as an integral aspect of how employees and the self-employed progress their careers.
Study travel writing focusing on the long 20th century. You will discuss three key ingredients of the genre: the travelling self, the journey and the destination. This module will examine a range of texts to explore issues such as the possibility of defining travel writing as a coherent genre and the key formal, thematic and material properties. You will also look at how social identity affects the way we travel and write about travel, and travel writing an excavation of the self, of the place visited, or both.
Explore the development of the Gothic from its literary origins in the mid-18th century through to the mid-20th century. You will analyse the literary and cultural properties of Gothicism as it has shifted and diversified over this period and you will be encouraged to engage with Gothic novels alongside a range of forms across a wide cultural and historical spectrum. This module will also introduce you to theoretical and critical methods of analysing the Gothic such as Freud?s concept of the uncanny and Julia Kristeva?s theory of abjection.
Understand how writers and film-makers have imagined city spaces and identities in a range of postcolonial locations. Through an exciting range of literary and cinematic texts, and drawing on theories of urban space, place, and postcoloniality, you will explore issues that are of central importance to the world many of us live in today, including migrant labour, asylum seekers, refugees, and illegal immigrants; crime, conflict, and policing; memory, history, and urban space; class, gender, race, sexuality, and the postcolonial city amongst others.
Study a selection of American plays from the 1920s to the 1990s, focusing on the ways in which they dramatise the relationship between public issues and private concerns. This module investigate the ways in which American drama stages the enduring conflict between the search for individual happiness and the making of social and political bonds in a society based on an ideology of competitive individualism. The module will provide opportunities to refine your skills in collaborative work, oral presentation, guided research, and independent study.
Engage with debates about masculinity which took place during the long 18th century. You will read a range of literary texts, including novels and poetry and focus on important models of 'manliness' which were prevalent in the period. This module will encourage you to situate texts in relation to historical context, and also to engage with theory.
Much of what the Victorians had regarded as natural, stable, and morally dependable about their society seemed to be under threat during the 19th century. Factors such as the arrival of the new woman and the decadent man, scandals of sexual predation in the London underworld, the criminalisation of male homosexuality, the anxious recognition of violence in the colonies and scientific theories of eugenics all placed a new and often unwanted spotlight on Victorian notions of gendered and sexual roles and behaviours, racial fitness and the right to imperial rule, and the moralising purpose of the arts. You will examine how writers articulated and responded to these concerns in the forging of identifiably `fin-de-siecle? aesthetics and mentalities.
Gain an understanding of the cultural connections between Africa and the African Diaspora through the analysis of a range of key literary works. Through close reading and analysis of the modules primary texts and the interrogation of postcolonial theoretical debates, you will be encouraged to explore the intersections and tensions between issues of race, gender, identity, education and language within the contexts of slavery, colonialism, migration and exile.
Study the autobiographical branch of creative non-fiction.You will complete a number of creative writing exercises and regular workshops to help you refine your work with feedback from fellow students and tutor feedback in class, online, verbally, and in writing. This module will see you read a range of exemplary works of autobiographical non-fiction with a critical eye to begin making connections between the techniques and approaches of published works and your own.
Understand the key concepts and debates in disability studies and how these can be applied to literary texts. This module will emphasise the centrality of literary studies to the emergent, interdisciplinary area of medical humanities.
Examine the relationships between writing and the Northern Ireland conflict (1966?1998). You will consider the ways in which writing responds to serious and prolonged political and social crisis and how it offers insights into issues normally considered to be purely within the realm of party or national politics. This module will enable you to understand the way literature negotiates the tensions between the demands of artistic integrity and independence and the pressures to speak out or to contribute towards the resolution of violent political division. You will also look at texts produced after 1998, a time of somewhat uncertain `peace and reconciliation?.
Examine the development of 20th-century fiction by women with particular reference to the genre of romantic fiction. You will explore how a number of writers have modified and transformed the conventions of romantic fiction and discuss the appeal of romantic fiction in terms of its specific historical contexts and in relation to psychoanalytic models of desire and narrative. This module will provide the opportunity to study these texts alongside some key feminist theories of gender and sexuality of the 20th century. You will be encouraged to develop advanced analytic skills, coupled with critical self-reflexivity in the understanding and application of theory. The group oral presentation of ideas and argument will build on your existing communication and collaboration skills.
Examine early- and mid-nineteenth-century literature through its remembrance of and continuing engagement with the slave trade and slavery in the Atlantic world. You’ll consider different forms of human bondage and various sites of enslavement through which authors and their readers thought about Britain’s past and present relation to slavery and the slave trade. This module will analyse how that relation was configured in a variety of literary forms. You’ll discuss how authors’ depictions of Atlantic slavery were informed by a variety of social debates, including: scientific and popular discourses on race; exploitation of Britain’s working classes, and the ‘condition of England’; gender relations, marriage, and the position of women in society; gendered understandings of the production of knowledge. You’ll compare nineteenth-century representations with twenty-first century debates, depictions and commemorations of Atlantic slavery.
Explore contemporary genres with an emphasis on their innovativeness, contemporaneity and their interaction with socio-cultural developments of the new millennium. You will engage with cutting edge texts to consider their innovations in and interactions with the contemporary world.
This module explores Renaissance tragedy with a particularly the sub-genre of revenge tragedy. You will explore canonical works such as Hamlet but also less familiar examples of the genre such as The Revenger?s Tragedy. You will understand and analyse the plays in relation to the culture in which they were produced and the ideological tensions which traverse them.
Examine a body of reading, thought, and practice in contemporary writing loosely understood as `avant-garde? or experimental writing. Given the renegade nature of these works, we will move away from using such generic categories as poetry or prose, even as we try to understand how these texts usefully extend and interrogate precisely those categories. Through a programme of close reading, in-class and online discussion, and independent study, you will critically and creatively engage with a rich tradition of contemporary literary practice.
This module will focus on the craft of writing drama for stage and audio (radio or podcast). It will introduce you to the foundations of scriptwriting for theatre and live performance. You'll be encouraged to consider the requirements of form and audience in each dramatic context - whether for live theatre, site specific performance or broadcast drama.
By reflecting on learning acquired through work placements, this module will focus on promoting self-awareness of your ‘career story’. You will look at how you evaluate your current skills, explore the future possibilities in your career development and navigate pathways through those chosen possibilities. This module will enable you to become ‘cartographer’ of your own future experience. You will embark upon a minimum of 80 hours work placement, supported by reflective exercises, and build expertise and confidence through a range of assessments designed by the course team and employer partners. Conceptualised and designed by digital specialists, the module is purposefully created to be delivered and experienced online – reflecting the increasingly distributed nature of work communications and embracing digital environments as an integral aspect of how employees and the self-employed progress their careers.
Study travel writing focusing on the long 20th century. You will discuss three key ingredients of the genre: the travelling self, the journey and the destination. This module will examine a range of texts to explore issues such as the possibility of defining travel writing as a coherent genre and the key formal, thematic and material properties. You will also look at how social identity affects the way we travel and write about travel, and travel writing an excavation of the self, of the place visited, or both.
Explore the development of the Gothic from its literary origins in the mid-18th century through to the mid-20th century. You will analyse the literary and cultural properties of Gothicism as it has shifted and diversified over this period and you will be encouraged to engage with Gothic novels alongside a range of forms across a wide cultural and historical spectrum. This module will also introduce you to theoretical and critical methods of analysing the Gothic such as Freud?s concept of the uncanny and Julia Kristeva?s theory of abjection.
Understand how writers and film-makers have imagined city spaces and identities in a range of postcolonial locations. Through an exciting range of literary and cinematic texts, and drawing on theories of urban space, place, and postcoloniality, you will explore issues that are of central importance to the world many of us live in today, including migrant labour, asylum seekers, refugees, and illegal immigrants; crime, conflict, and policing; memory, history, and urban space; class, gender, race, sexuality, and the postcolonial city amongst others.
Study a selection of American plays from the 1920s to the 1990s, focusing on the ways in which they dramatise the relationship between public issues and private concerns. This module investigate the ways in which American drama stages the enduring conflict between the search for individual happiness and the making of social and political bonds in a society based on an ideology of competitive individualism. The module will provide opportunities to refine your skills in collaborative work, oral presentation, guided research, and independent study.
Engage with debates about masculinity which took place during the long 18th century. You will read a range of literary texts, including novels and poetry and focus on important models of 'manliness' which were prevalent in the period. This module will encourage you to situate texts in relation to historical context, and also to engage with theory.
Much of what the Victorians had regarded as natural, stable, and morally dependable about their society seemed to be under threat during the 19th century. Factors such as the arrival of the new woman and the decadent man, scandals of sexual predation in the London underworld, the criminalisation of male homosexuality, the anxious recognition of violence in the colonies and scientific theories of eugenics all placed a new and often unwanted spotlight on Victorian notions of gendered and sexual roles and behaviours, racial fitness and the right to imperial rule, and the moralising purpose of the arts. You will examine how writers articulated and responded to these concerns in the forging of identifiably `fin-de-siecle? aesthetics and mentalities.
Gain an understanding of the cultural connections between Africa and the African Diaspora through the analysis of a range of key literary works. Through close reading and analysis of the modules primary texts and the interrogation of postcolonial theoretical debates, you will be encouraged to explore the intersections and tensions between issues of race, gender, identity, education and language within the contexts of slavery, colonialism, migration and exile.
Study the autobiographical branch of creative non-fiction.You will complete a number of creative writing exercises and regular workshops to help you refine your work with feedback from fellow students and tutor feedback in class, online, verbally, and in writing. This module will see you read a range of exemplary works of autobiographical non-fiction with a critical eye to begin making connections between the techniques and approaches of published works and your own.
Understand the key concepts and debates in disability studies and how these can be applied to literary texts. This module will emphasise the centrality of literary studies to the emergent, interdisciplinary area of medical humanities.
Examine the relationships between writing and the Northern Ireland conflict (1966?1998). You will consider the ways in which writing responds to serious and prolonged political and social crisis and how it offers insights into issues normally considered to be purely within the realm of party or national politics. This module will enable you to understand the way literature negotiates the tensions between the demands of artistic integrity and independence and the pressures to speak out or to contribute towards the resolution of violent political division. You will also look at texts produced after 1998, a time of somewhat uncertain `peace and reconciliation?.
Examine the development of 20th-century fiction by women with particular reference to the genre of romantic fiction. You will explore how a number of writers have modified and transformed the conventions of romantic fiction and discuss the appeal of romantic fiction in terms of its specific historical contexts and in relation to psychoanalytic models of desire and narrative. This module will provide the opportunity to study these texts alongside some key feminist theories of gender and sexuality of the 20th century. You will be encouraged to develop advanced analytic skills, coupled with critical self-reflexivity in the understanding and application of theory. The group oral presentation of ideas and argument will build on your existing communication and collaboration skills.
Examine early- and mid-nineteenth-century literature through its remembrance of and continuing engagement with the slave trade and slavery in the Atlantic world. You’ll consider different forms of human bondage and various sites of enslavement through which authors and their readers thought about Britain’s past and present relation to slavery and the slave trade. This module will analyse how that relation was configured in a variety of literary forms. You’ll discuss how authors’ depictions of Atlantic slavery were informed by a variety of social debates, including: scientific and popular discourses on race; exploitation of Britain’s working classes, and the ‘condition of England’; gender relations, marriage, and the position of women in society; gendered understandings of the production of knowledge. You’ll compare nineteenth-century representations with twenty-first century debates, depictions and commemorations of Atlantic slavery.
Explore contemporary genres with an emphasis on their innovativeness, contemporaneity and their interaction with socio-cultural developments of the new millennium. You will engage with cutting edge texts to consider their innovations in and interactions with the contemporary world.
This module explores Renaissance tragedy with a particularly the sub-genre of revenge tragedy. You will explore canonical works such as Hamlet but also less familiar examples of the genre such as The Revenger?s Tragedy. You will understand and analyse the plays in relation to the culture in which they were produced and the ideological tensions which traverse them.