BA (Hons)

Politics

Teaching & Learning

The tabs below detail what and how you will study in each year of your course. The balance of assessments and overall workload will be informed by your core modules and the option modules you choose to study; the information provided is an indication of what you can expect and may be subject to change. The option modules listed are also an indication of what will be available to you. Their availability is subject to demand and you will be advised which option modules you can choose at the beginning of each year of study.

Due to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic we are currently unable to advise on the mode of teaching for September 2021, however we will keep you updated and provide more information as soon as we can. We continue to follow government guidance and your teaching and learning will reflect the restrictions in place at the time of delivery. We currently anticipate that you may experience a blended approach – this is a mix of face-to-face, on campus and online teaching and learning. You can keep up to date with teaching and learning at Leeds Beckett via our Covid-19 website. Updated course specifications will be available in August 2021. In the meantime, our existing course specifications are available.

What you'll learn

Gain a critical introduction to the history and contemporary evolution of political economy. You will engage with a variety of key historical thinkers and theoretical approaches in order to develop a qualitative understanding of the rich tapestry of political economy.
Understand the the nature and structure of the international system, and how modern states evolve and develop. Consider the evolution of the 20th Century States System, beginning with the decline of pax-Britannica, the inter-war crisis, the emergence of pax-Americana, the establishment and design of key international institutions, the Cold War, the end of the Cold War, rise of non-state actors, globalisation, the decline of the west and the rise of China, the ongoing economic crisis and democratisation.
Explore a series of real world concerns as a starting point from which to look at issues in contemporary political theory. By looking at issues such as freedom, equality, violence and rights, you will attempt to provoke critical engagement and reflection on the contested nature of contemporary political theory.
Political ideologies may be understood as frameworks of political understanding and commitment that are at the heart of political debate and have helped to shape the world we live in. You will explore the core ideas and beliefs of these major ideologies, to examine debates within and between ideologies, and to develop your own critical thinking in this area.
Politics is fundamentally concerned with governance, which involves making and implementing collective decisions and rules. You will see how this involves a range of actors and institutions and is not just a matter for government or the state. UK governance will be the main focus but the United States will also be referred to in a comparative approach. You will also see how governance operates at multiple levels, not just within a national framework.
Gain a critical introduction to the history and contemporary evolution of political economy. You will engage with a variety of key historical thinkers and theoretical approaches in order to develop a qualitative understanding of the rich tapestry of political economy.
Understand the the nature and structure of the international system, and how modern states evolve and develop. Consider the evolution of the 20th Century States System, beginning with the decline of pax-Britannica, the inter-war crisis, the emergence of pax-Americana, the establishment and design of key international institutions, the Cold War, the end of the Cold War, rise of non-state actors, globalisation, the decline of the west and the rise of China, the ongoing economic crisis and democratisation.
Explore a series of real world concerns as a starting point from which to look at issues in contemporary political theory. By looking at issues such as freedom, equality, violence and rights, you will attempt to provoke critical engagement and reflection on the contested nature of contemporary political theory.
Political ideologies may be understood as frameworks of political understanding and commitment that are at the heart of political debate and have helped to shape the world we live in. You will explore the core ideas and beliefs of these major ideologies, to examine debates within and between ideologies, and to develop your own critical thinking in this area.
Politics is fundamentally concerned with governance, which involves making and implementing collective decisions and rules. You will see how this involves a range of actors and institutions and is not just a matter for government or the state. UK governance will be the main focus but the United States will also be referred to in a comparative approach. You will also see how governance operates at multiple levels, not just within a national framework.

What you'll learn

You will investigate the nature, development and prospects of the state using a variety of theoretical approaches, and consider big questions about the state, such as: why should we obey the state? who has power and how is political influence exercised? does business exercise unrivalled influence? what are the arguments for `growing' or `shrinking' the state? is globalisation forcing the state to retreat?
Explores the UK's relationship with the EU, and investigate the application of appropriate theory in order to understand both the access of the UK and its decision to exit.
Investigate the concept of citizenship and actively engage with it by undertaking a voluntary placement. This placement will be related to the scope of your course and reflect on their experiences to enhance your employability.
Inequality is everywhere. People are treated differently or affected disproportionately because of their gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, age, disability, and immigration status. In this module you will conduct research on how inequalities are present at local, national and global levels.
You will investigate the nature, development and prospects of the state using a variety of theoretical approaches, and consider big questions about the state, such as: why should we obey the state? who has power and how is political influence exercised? does business exercise unrivalled influence? what are the arguments for `growing' or `shrinking' the state? is globalisation forcing the state to retreat?
Explores the UK's relationship with the EU, and investigate the application of appropriate theory in order to understand both the access of the UK and its decision to exit.
Investigate the concept of citizenship and actively engage with it by undertaking a voluntary placement. This placement will be related to the scope of your course and reflect on their experiences to enhance your employability.
Inequality is everywhere. People are treated differently or affected disproportionately because of their gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, age, disability, and immigration status. In this module you will conduct research on how inequalities are present at local, national and global levels.

Option modules may include

Explore the historical evolution of international human rights law at the United Nations. You will explore what rights are covered by the conventions and how the UN and human rights advocates use these legal mechanisms to promote and protect human rights internationally.
Examine the various debates within human rights, looking at the different theoretical frameworks scholars employ in the study and practice of this field. Take specific controversial debates within the field and explore them in depth. You will be challenged to see the complex nature of human rights as a moral framework for political action.
Study the evolution and dynamics of development in the global south from the period of post-WWII state-led development to contemporary processes of neoliberal globalisation. Students will engage with a variety of theoretical approaches in order to understand concrete empirical issues facing development in the global south.
You will investigate the complexity of local socio-economic development and livelihood security in the global south. Look at current theories, policy and practice of community engagement and poverty alleviation. The local experience of development policy and the influence of donors and global partnerships for development will be examined along with some key poverty alleviation initiatives such as the livelihoods approach, micro-finance and social protection.
Gain an overview of contemporary security issues, encompassing different perspectives from the state to the individual, and how security threats have changed over time and continue to change.
Understand and examine the way communities, states, organisations and institutions tackle violent conflicts (or potentially violent conflict situations). Using a range of theoretical models, case studies from around the world, and by relating this to your own experience, you'll learn about your own conflict styles, how to analyse conflicts and the different roles played by the UN and local communities in peacebuilding. You'll also become familiar with current debates in conflict resolution and peacebuilding.
Assess the evidence for global environmental crisis, and efforts at global cooperation to address the issues. You'll consider issues such as responsibility, and the role of environmental movements and alternative models of development.
Gain an insight into the key concepts, methods and debates within Marxism and develop your capacity to reflect upon the political relevance of Marxism today. The module will be geared towards a critical understanding of capitalism and its evolution as a historically specific mode of production.
Develop an understanding of the key theories of peace, warfare and security, and their relevance to and practice in the 21st century.
Explore the historical evolution of international human rights law at the United Nations. You will explore what rights are covered by the conventions and how the UN and human rights advocates use these legal mechanisms to promote and protect human rights internationally.
Examine the various debates within human rights, looking at the different theoretical frameworks scholars employ in the study and practice of this field. Take specific controversial debates within the field and explore them in depth. You will be challenged to see the complex nature of human rights as a moral framework for political action.
Study the evolution and dynamics of development in the global south from the period of post-WWII state-led development to contemporary processes of neoliberal globalisation. Students will engage with a variety of theoretical approaches in order to understand concrete empirical issues facing development in the global south.
You will investigate the complexity of local socio-economic development and livelihood security in the global south. Look at current theories, policy and practice of community engagement and poverty alleviation. The local experience of development policy and the influence of donors and global partnerships for development will be examined along with some key poverty alleviation initiatives such as the livelihoods approach, micro-finance and social protection.
Gain an overview of contemporary security issues, encompassing different perspectives from the state to the individual, and how security threats have changed over time and continue to change.
Understand and examine the way communities, states, organisations and institutions tackle violent conflicts (or potentially violent conflict situations). Using a range of theoretical models, case studies from around the world, and by relating this to your own experience, you'll learn about your own conflict styles, how to analyse conflicts and the different roles played by the UN and local communities in peacebuilding. You'll also become familiar with current debates in conflict resolution and peacebuilding.
Assess the evidence for global environmental crisis, and efforts at global cooperation to address the issues. You'll consider issues such as responsibility, and the role of environmental movements and alternative models of development.
Gain an insight into the key concepts, methods and debates within Marxism and develop your capacity to reflect upon the political relevance of Marxism today. The module will be geared towards a critical understanding of capitalism and its evolution as a historically specific mode of production.
Develop an understanding of the key theories of peace, warfare and security, and their relevance to and practice in the 21st century.

What you'll learn

Get an introduction to the ideas of global governance and globalisation and the intersection between them. You will begin to think critically about future patterns of world order and their institutionalisation.
Focus on a subject of your choosing related to politics and your own future aspirations. You will be required to select a politics-based dissertation topic and to engage with theoretical, methods and empirical material that is appropriate to study in this field. You will identify, plan and deliver a sustained and in-depth piece of work, linking it to theory, and critically reflect on your subject matter and research findings.
Explore the operation, practice and context of contemporary policy making at the national level. Examine the actors, mechanisms and practice of policy making, and the drivers of policy change, via a focus on specific case studies. You will engage with key decision making theories and models of the policy process, exploring how institutional analyses and other theoretical approaches help to understand the complexity of the policy process.
Get an introduction to the ideas of global governance and globalisation and the intersection between them. You will begin to think critically about future patterns of world order and their institutionalisation.
Focus on a subject of your choosing related to politics and your own future aspirations. You will be required to select a politics-based dissertation topic and to engage with theoretical, methods and empirical material that is appropriate to study in this field. You will identify, plan and deliver a sustained and in-depth piece of work, linking it to theory, and critically reflect on your subject matter and research findings.
Explore the operation, practice and context of contemporary policy making at the national level. Examine the actors, mechanisms and practice of policy making, and the drivers of policy change, via a focus on specific case studies. You will engage with key decision making theories and models of the policy process, exploring how institutional analyses and other theoretical approaches help to understand the complexity of the policy process.

Option modules may include

This module will provide an advanced introduction to current debates about the persisting relevance of colonialism to thinking about politics today. It will introduce you to the critical theoretical literature around ‘coloniality’ and race from post-colonial and decolonial perspectives and applies these ideas to contemporary political issues.
Study the development of peacekeeping, differences in missions and roles, and current theories of peacekeeping. This will include deterrence, relationship building, proactive presence, conflict resolution and unarmed civilian peacekeeping.
Consider the key issues and challenges in British politics today. You'll study the 'postwar consensus', Thatcherism, the rise and fall of New Labour and Brexit Britain. You'll examine important issues such as the potential fracturing of the UK (given resurgent Scottish nationalism), how the British government can adapt to its post-Brexit future, the effect of social media on British politics and electoral campaigning. You'll also look at the role of structured inequalities in British politics and society.
Explore the operation, practice and context of contemporary diplomacy and international relations. You'll study the traditional forms of and approaches to diplomacy. And you'll analyse the impact of changes in the international system on the practice and operation of international relations.
This module will introduce the key issues in understanding development and change at a community, grassroots level. You'll study the policy contexts that influence community development. And you'll tackle key issues including funding, diversity and accountability.
Through a series of workshops, you will focus on the politics of social justice and nonviolent resistance, the context within which activism takes place, and the key players that undertake the work of social change. You will explore these issues in greater depth through case studies of activism undertaken in particular geographical areas (i.e Africa, Myanmar, Russia, Brazil) as well as on different issues (i.e Corruption, landrights, oppression and environmental protection).
Discover the field of study known as International Political Economy (IPE). You will engage with a variety of theoretical and empirical debates in order to situate and understand the field of IPE and its major object of study globalisation. Emphasis will be placed on how different theoretical approaches seek to understand, reform and critique the contemporary global political economy.
Focus on the politics of human rights movement, the context within which it operates and its key players. Workshops will allow you to explore these issues in greater depth as well as providing the opportunity for group work and practical exercises.
Investigate the related issues of terrorism, security and human rights. You will explore the synthesis between the fear of terrorism which is a pervasive threat felt by both states and individuals, the response to these threats that states adopt in creating security policy, and the impact upon human and civil rights.
This module will provide an advanced introduction to current debates about the persisting relevance of colonialism to thinking about politics today. It will introduce you to the critical theoretical literature around ‘coloniality’ and race from post-colonial and decolonial perspectives and applies these ideas to contemporary political issues.
Study the development of peacekeeping, differences in missions and roles, and current theories of peacekeeping. This will include deterrence, relationship building, proactive presence, conflict resolution and unarmed civilian peacekeeping.
Consider the key issues and challenges in British politics today. You'll study the 'postwar consensus', Thatcherism, the rise and fall of New Labour and Brexit Britain. You'll examine important issues such as the potential fracturing of the UK (given resurgent Scottish nationalism), how the British government can adapt to its post-Brexit future, the effect of social media on British politics and electoral campaigning. You'll also look at the role of structured inequalities in British politics and society.
Explore the operation, practice and context of contemporary diplomacy and international relations. You'll study the traditional forms of and approaches to diplomacy. And you'll analyse the impact of changes in the international system on the practice and operation of international relations.
This module will introduce the key issues in understanding development and change at a community, grassroots level. You'll study the policy contexts that influence community development. And you'll tackle key issues including funding, diversity and accountability.
Through a series of workshops, you will focus on the politics of social justice and nonviolent resistance, the context within which activism takes place, and the key players that undertake the work of social change. You will explore these issues in greater depth through case studies of activism undertaken in particular geographical areas (i.e Africa, Myanmar, Russia, Brazil) as well as on different issues (i.e Corruption, landrights, oppression and environmental protection).
Discover the field of study known as International Political Economy (IPE). You will engage with a variety of theoretical and empirical debates in order to situate and understand the field of IPE and its major object of study globalisation. Emphasis will be placed on how different theoretical approaches seek to understand, reform and critique the contemporary global political economy.
Focus on the politics of human rights movement, the context within which it operates and its key players. Workshops will allow you to explore these issues in greater depth as well as providing the opportunity for group work and practical exercises.
Investigate the related issues of terrorism, security and human rights. You will explore the synthesis between the fear of terrorism which is a pervasive threat felt by both states and individuals, the response to these threats that states adopt in creating security policy, and the impact upon human and civil rights.