BSc (Hons)

Psychology

Teaching & Learning

The tabs below detail what and how you will study in each year of your course. The balance of assessments and overall workload will be informed by your core modules and the option modules you choose to study; the information provided is an indication of what you can expect and may be subject to change. The option modules listed are also an indication of what will be available to you. Their availability is subject to demand and you will be advised which option modules you can choose at the beginning of each year of study.

Due to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic we are currently unable to advise on the mode of teaching for September 2021, however we will keep you updated and provide more information as soon as we can. We continue to follow government guidance and your teaching and learning will reflect the restrictions in place at the time of delivery. We currently anticipate that you may experience a blended approach – this is a mix of face-to-face, on campus and online teaching and learning. You can keep up to date with teaching and learning at Leeds Beckett via our Covid-19 website. Updated course specifications will be available in August 2021. In the meantime, our existing course specifications are available.

What you'll learn

Develop your theoretical understanding of the scientific method of knowledge acquisition. You will also develop skills in numerical reasoning, statistical analysis (with an emphasis on test of differences), and you will practise communicating the results of research in the form of a research report.
Develop your critical thinking and reflective learning which are required in all other Psychology modules. It also enables you to practise and master key skills such as literature searching, presenting arguments for a case, essay writing, referencing and reviewing an article.
You will be introduced to the main theoretical perspectives and research techniques developed by social and developmental psychologists. You will explore the way in which current issues and topics have been addressed by social and developmental psychologists. The seminar activities and assessment will provide you with the opportunity to consider ways in which psychological knowledge and research is applied.
This module will support you in your learning and understanding of core concept areas in the fields of biological and cognitive psychology. The biological strand introduces students to the basic anatomy of the central nervous system and peripheral nervous system, and how these underlie behavioural processes such as sleep, emotion, memory, and drug use. The cognitive strand explores the cognitive basis of memory, attention, perception, thinking, learning, emotion, and sleep. Through a combination of lectures and laboratory-based practicals you will gain an understanding of the main theoretical and methodological approaches in both fields.
Explore the major perspectives on mental health in psychology, its assessment and therapy/treatment. You will also take a brief overview of the historical perceptions of 'madness'. You will make connections between socio-cultural influences and individual psychopathological behaviour, including the relationship between theory and practice in mental health field.
Develop your theoretical understanding of the scientific method of knowledge acquisition. You will also develop skills in numerical reasoning, statistical analysis (with an emphasis on test of differences), and you will practise communicating the results of research in the form of a research report.
Develop your critical thinking and reflective learning which are required in all other Psychology modules. It also enables you to practise and master key skills such as literature searching, presenting arguments for a case, essay writing, referencing and reviewing an article.
You will be introduced to the main theoretical perspectives and research techniques developed by social and developmental psychologists. You will explore the way in which current issues and topics have been addressed by social and developmental psychologists. The seminar activities and assessment will provide you with the opportunity to consider ways in which psychological knowledge and research is applied.
This module will support you in your learning and understanding of core concept areas in the fields of biological and cognitive psychology. The biological strand introduces students to the basic anatomy of the central nervous system and peripheral nervous system, and how these underlie behavioural processes such as sleep, emotion, memory, and drug use. The cognitive strand explores the cognitive basis of memory, attention, perception, thinking, learning, emotion, and sleep. Through a combination of lectures and laboratory-based practicals you will gain an understanding of the main theoretical and methodological approaches in both fields.
Explore the major perspectives on mental health in psychology, its assessment and therapy/treatment. You will also take a brief overview of the historical perceptions of 'madness'. You will make connections between socio-cultural influences and individual psychopathological behaviour, including the relationship between theory and practice in mental health field.

What you'll learn

Learn about how we think, feel and understand the social world we live in. This will include; how we communicate, think and make sense of our life, and the people we meet in it, how we make sense of ourselves, the relationships we have, and the values we hold about ourselves and others. You’ll also learn about how we may behave and think in the groups we belong to and how we think about and act towards the groups we feel we don’t belong to.
You will develop an in-depth knowledge of the biological mechanisms underpinning the human visual, sensory and motor systems. The module also introduces the biological theories and treatments of psychopathology. Through a combination of lectures and lab based learning, you will develop transferrable specialised research and technological skills.
Build upon the Intermediate Research Methods module. You will advance your theoretical understanding and application of the scientific-investigative methods with particular emphasis on the assumption, collection, analysis and presentation of both quantitative and qualitative data. You will also develop your ability to use and interpret advanced statistical techniques (e.g., ANOVA, multiple regression) and collect and analyse qualitative data using specific approaches (e.g., Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis, Discourse Analysis).
Focus on the key areas within individual differences including: theories of personality; intelligence; emotion; psychometrics; and the application of individual differences in real life situations, with particular reference to principles and methods derived from occupational/work psychology.
Further enhance your understanding of the main theories, applications and research techniques developed by developmental psychologists. You will consider the genetic, environmental and learned influences affecting development. You will also explore current issues and topics, taking a lifespan perspective to understand human psychological development.
Explore in greater depth some of the philosophical, theoretical and epistemological assumptions that support qualitative research paradigms. You’ll be introduced to and utilise more advanced methods of qualitative data collection and analysis/interpretation, including more creative and contemporary ways of conducting research interviews (e.g. the use of the photo elicitation technique), media text analysis, Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis and Critical Discourse Analysis.
Build on your cognitive psychology knowledge obtained in your first year and learn about how core domains of cognition contribute to higher order cognitive functions such as problem solving, executive function and metacognition. Expanding the horizons of cognitive psychology, you’ll also consider the influence of emotional states on cognition and in turn, the role of cognitive biases in the generation of emotion.
Learn about how we think, feel and understand the social world we live in. This will include; how we communicate, think and make sense of our life, and the people we meet in it, how we make sense of ourselves, the relationships we have, and the values we hold about ourselves and others. You’ll also learn about how we may behave and think in the groups we belong to and how we think about and act towards the groups we feel we don’t belong to.
You will develop an in-depth knowledge of the biological mechanisms underpinning the human visual, sensory and motor systems. The module also introduces the biological theories and treatments of psychopathology. Through a combination of lectures and lab based learning, you will develop transferrable specialised research and technological skills.
Build upon the Intermediate Research Methods module. You will advance your theoretical understanding and application of the scientific-investigative methods with particular emphasis on the assumption, collection, analysis and presentation of both quantitative and qualitative data. You will also develop your ability to use and interpret advanced statistical techniques (e.g., ANOVA, multiple regression) and collect and analyse qualitative data using specific approaches (e.g., Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis, Discourse Analysis).
Focus on the key areas within individual differences including: theories of personality; intelligence; emotion; psychometrics; and the application of individual differences in real life situations, with particular reference to principles and methods derived from occupational/work psychology.
Further enhance your understanding of the main theories, applications and research techniques developed by developmental psychologists. You will consider the genetic, environmental and learned influences affecting development. You will also explore current issues and topics, taking a lifespan perspective to understand human psychological development.
Explore in greater depth some of the philosophical, theoretical and epistemological assumptions that support qualitative research paradigms. You’ll be introduced to and utilise more advanced methods of qualitative data collection and analysis/interpretation, including more creative and contemporary ways of conducting research interviews (e.g. the use of the photo elicitation technique), media text analysis, Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis and Critical Discourse Analysis.
Build on your cognitive psychology knowledge obtained in your first year and learn about how core domains of cognition contribute to higher order cognitive functions such as problem solving, executive function and metacognition. Expanding the horizons of cognitive psychology, you’ll also consider the influence of emotional states on cognition and in turn, the role of cognitive biases in the generation of emotion.

Option modules may include

Explore a broad range of topics and debates within this field, covering theoretical concerns and practical applications of cyberpsychology. You’ll develop an understanding of key methodological and ethical issues arising from internet-mediated psychology research.
Develop an in-depth understanding of the social, psychological and biochemical factors relating to drug use and abuse. You will gain knowledge of pharmacokinetics, acute and chronic drug effects and current treatment strategies. Through a combination of lectures and lab based learning, you will develop specialist knowledge and transferrable research and technological skills relevant to careers in the field of addiction e.g. drug rehabilitation, drug counselling, psychopharmacology.
This module will focus on the relevance of anti-racism in the following fields: academia, applied psychology (e.g., educational psychology, clinical psychology and/or health psychology), healthcare and other public institutions.
You will be introduced to a range of methodologies to study human memory including the experimental, neuroscientific, neuropsychological approaches as well as those relying on subjective reports. You’ll learn about key phenomena surrounding human memory including concepts of knowledge, theories of forgetting and will learn to appreciate the difference between everyday and pathological memory failures in a lifespan neuropsychology context.
Gain an understanding of the array of socio-cultural, physical, psychological and interpersonal factors that influence how people think and feel about their bodies, and how these factors are linked to people’s thoughts, feelings and behaviour (e.g. eating attitudes and behaviours, exercise, body adornment and modification, as well as behaviours such as sexual risk taking and drug use).
Gain an in-depth and critical knowledge on a variety of different areas of psychology that try to understand thinking, identities, experiences and practices associated with womanhood. These areas will range from the study of women and love, women and work, to women and sexuality. You will begin to understand and evaluate the competing and conflicting accounts of womanhood.
Explore professional practice within a field of psychology as you engage in a real-world project pertinent to one of these fields, and develop transferrable skills that will enhance your employability.
Explore contemporary applications of psychological theories in mental and physical wellbeing. Specifically, you’ll study theories, preventions, and supportive interventions in different applied contexts such as schools, community, health and rehabilitation settings.
Explore a broad range of topics and debates within this field, covering theoretical concerns and practical applications of cyberpsychology. You’ll develop an understanding of key methodological and ethical issues arising from internet-mediated psychology research.
Develop an in-depth understanding of the social, psychological and biochemical factors relating to drug use and abuse. You will gain knowledge of pharmacokinetics, acute and chronic drug effects and current treatment strategies. Through a combination of lectures and lab based learning, you will develop specialist knowledge and transferrable research and technological skills relevant to careers in the field of addiction e.g. drug rehabilitation, drug counselling, psychopharmacology.
This module will focus on the relevance of anti-racism in the following fields: academia, applied psychology (e.g., educational psychology, clinical psychology and/or health psychology), healthcare and other public institutions.
You will be introduced to a range of methodologies to study human memory including the experimental, neuroscientific, neuropsychological approaches as well as those relying on subjective reports. You’ll learn about key phenomena surrounding human memory including concepts of knowledge, theories of forgetting and will learn to appreciate the difference between everyday and pathological memory failures in a lifespan neuropsychology context.
Gain an understanding of the array of socio-cultural, physical, psychological and interpersonal factors that influence how people think and feel about their bodies, and how these factors are linked to people’s thoughts, feelings and behaviour (e.g. eating attitudes and behaviours, exercise, body adornment and modification, as well as behaviours such as sexual risk taking and drug use).
Gain an in-depth and critical knowledge on a variety of different areas of psychology that try to understand thinking, identities, experiences and practices associated with womanhood. These areas will range from the study of women and love, women and work, to women and sexuality. You will begin to understand and evaluate the competing and conflicting accounts of womanhood.
Explore professional practice within a field of psychology as you engage in a real-world project pertinent to one of these fields, and develop transferrable skills that will enhance your employability.
Explore contemporary applications of psychological theories in mental and physical wellbeing. Specifically, you’ll study theories, preventions, and supportive interventions in different applied contexts such as schools, community, health and rehabilitation settings.

What you'll learn

Explore some central themes within critical psychology and some philosophical ideas that have informed critical thinking. These will include debates about whether psychology is/should be 'scientific', whether psychology contributes to the oppression or invisibility of certain groups and whether psychology takes sufficient account of context (e.g. cultural, historical, political, ideological, situational etc). You’ll then consider the ways in which mainstream and critical psychologists have conceptualised and studied things like gender, race, ethnicity, social class, 'normality'/'abnormality' and the self, as well as the limitations and implications of these.
Undertake a research project in psychology, and further enhance and showcase the skills you’ve developed through your study of research methods. This module has a strong emphasis on self-management and provides the opportunity to demonstrate your skills in project management, problem-solving, and independent thought.
Explore some central themes within critical psychology and some philosophical ideas that have informed critical thinking. These will include debates about whether psychology is/should be 'scientific', whether psychology contributes to the oppression or invisibility of certain groups and whether psychology takes sufficient account of context (e.g. cultural, historical, political, ideological, situational etc). You’ll then consider the ways in which mainstream and critical psychologists have conceptualised and studied things like gender, race, ethnicity, social class, 'normality'/'abnormality' and the self, as well as the limitations and implications of these.
Undertake a research project in psychology, and further enhance and showcase the skills you’ve developed through your study of research methods. This module has a strong emphasis on self-management and provides the opportunity to demonstrate your skills in project management, problem-solving, and independent thought.

Option modules may include

This module will provide a unique opportunity for you to learn psychology alongside prisoners or ex-offenders. It will develop your understanding and critical consideration of factors that affect wellbeing such as sleep, stress, exercise. You’ll also consider evidence relating to wellbeing both in and out of prison and to reflect on people’s experience of wellbeing in different contexts.
Explore the role of applied health psychology in relation to medical illness and foster a critical understanding of the debates within the field. You will critically evaluate the application of psychological theory (social cognition, health behaviour change) to medical practice, specifically including the design and evaluation of complex health interventions, medical decision making, patient reported outcome measures (PROMs), electronic technologies, collaborative care and patient experience. You will develop your knowledge of applied health psychology in medical practice by exploring contemporary applications of psychological theory to supportive interventions to promote health and monitor disease and empower patients across a range of different health settings.
Learn and understand the psychology and physiology of stress, and its impact on health. You will explore the effects of stress on the immune system, sleeping behaviours, eating behaviours and cognitive performance. Various potentially stress-reducing interventions that may be beneficial to health (e.g. nutritional supplementation and diet; exercise; coping) will also be discussed in order to further encourage understanding of the biopsychological pathways linking stress and health.
Gain an introduction to clinical and counselling psychology specialisms. You will develop an understanding of a range of common mental health problems, their key symptoms and underlying theoretical explanations (for example, emotional disorders, schizophrenia, personality disorders, eating disorders and addictions) and the ability to critically evaluate the major approaches in the psychological therapies, which may be drawn upon in the alleviation of these problems.
Explore the central themes within critical psychology and some philosophical ideas that have informed critical thinking. These will include debates about whether psychology is/should be 'scientific', whether psychology contributes to the oppression or invisibility of certain groups and whether psychology takes sufficient account of context (e.g. cultural, historical, political, ideological, situational etc). You will then move on to consider the ways in which mainstream and critical psychologists have conceptualised and studied things like gender, race, ethnicity, social class, 'normality'/'abnormality' and the self, as well as the limitations and implications of these.
Apply your knowledge of developmental psychology to real-life situations. You will focus on educational settings, special educational needs and educational psychology, although other careers and settings are considered: working with children will involve working in multidisciplinary teams to some extent. You will also have the opportunity to reflect on and develop ideas for future careers with children.
You will study forensic psychology, which can be thought of as the intersection between psychology and the criminal justice system. It typically covers psychology and crime, and psychology and law. The module also provides varied opportunities for you to apply your knowledge, understanding and critical thinking to fictitious and real-world contexts, and to celebrate your achievements with a wider audience at an end-of-module poster conference.
Health psychologists have expertise in understanding the things that influence people’s health and wellbeing. They use their expertise in psychology to develop interventions to change behaviour. The teaching team on this module have research expertise in several applied health areas: body image and eating disorders, reproductive health, quality of life, shared decision-making, stress, oncology, and health service interventions. You will explore different specialities in health psychology, covering both quantitative and qualitative approaches, to gain an understanding of why people behave the way they do and how to provide services that will meet individuals' needs and promote health and wellbeing.
Explore contemporary applications of social science theory to develop an applied anti-racist intervention relating to a specific institution such as the discipline of psychology, education and healthcare.
Study the development of human communication throughout the lifespan. With an emphasis on understanding the multi-faceted nature of communication, the module reviews the practical applications of communication theories.
This module will provide a unique opportunity for you to learn psychology alongside prisoners or ex-offenders. It will develop your understanding and critical consideration of factors that affect wellbeing such as sleep, stress, exercise. You’ll also consider evidence relating to wellbeing both in and out of prison and to reflect on people’s experience of wellbeing in different contexts.
Explore the role of applied health psychology in relation to medical illness and foster a critical understanding of the debates within the field. You will critically evaluate the application of psychological theory (social cognition, health behaviour change) to medical practice, specifically including the design and evaluation of complex health interventions, medical decision making, patient reported outcome measures (PROMs), electronic technologies, collaborative care and patient experience. You will develop your knowledge of applied health psychology in medical practice by exploring contemporary applications of psychological theory to supportive interventions to promote health and monitor disease and empower patients across a range of different health settings.
Learn and understand the psychology and physiology of stress, and its impact on health. You will explore the effects of stress on the immune system, sleeping behaviours, eating behaviours and cognitive performance. Various potentially stress-reducing interventions that may be beneficial to health (e.g. nutritional supplementation and diet; exercise; coping) will also be discussed in order to further encourage understanding of the biopsychological pathways linking stress and health.
Gain an introduction to clinical and counselling psychology specialisms. You will develop an understanding of a range of common mental health problems, their key symptoms and underlying theoretical explanations (for example, emotional disorders, schizophrenia, personality disorders, eating disorders and addictions) and the ability to critically evaluate the major approaches in the psychological therapies, which may be drawn upon in the alleviation of these problems.
Explore the central themes within critical psychology and some philosophical ideas that have informed critical thinking. These will include debates about whether psychology is/should be 'scientific', whether psychology contributes to the oppression or invisibility of certain groups and whether psychology takes sufficient account of context (e.g. cultural, historical, political, ideological, situational etc). You will then move on to consider the ways in which mainstream and critical psychologists have conceptualised and studied things like gender, race, ethnicity, social class, 'normality'/'abnormality' and the self, as well as the limitations and implications of these.
Apply your knowledge of developmental psychology to real-life situations. You will focus on educational settings, special educational needs and educational psychology, although other careers and settings are considered: working with children will involve working in multidisciplinary teams to some extent. You will also have the opportunity to reflect on and develop ideas for future careers with children.
You will study forensic psychology, which can be thought of as the intersection between psychology and the criminal justice system. It typically covers psychology and crime, and psychology and law. The module also provides varied opportunities for you to apply your knowledge, understanding and critical thinking to fictitious and real-world contexts, and to celebrate your achievements with a wider audience at an end-of-module poster conference.
Health psychologists have expertise in understanding the things that influence people’s health and wellbeing. They use their expertise in psychology to develop interventions to change behaviour. The teaching team on this module have research expertise in several applied health areas: body image and eating disorders, reproductive health, quality of life, shared decision-making, stress, oncology, and health service interventions. You will explore different specialities in health psychology, covering both quantitative and qualitative approaches, to gain an understanding of why people behave the way they do and how to provide services that will meet individuals' needs and promote health and wellbeing.
Explore contemporary applications of social science theory to develop an applied anti-racist intervention relating to a specific institution such as the discipline of psychology, education and healthcare.
Study the development of human communication throughout the lifespan. With an emphasis on understanding the multi-faceted nature of communication, the module reviews the practical applications of communication theories.

This course offers the opportunity to take a ‘sandwich’ year – a year of paid employment in industry which will build your skills and experience. This is usually taken between the second and third year of your degree, typically making your course four years in total.

Students who choose the sandwich route find it helps with both their studies and getting a job after graduation. It can build your confidence, contacts, and of course your CV. Leeds Beckett advertise lots of placement opportunities and provide support in helping you find the right placement for you.