BA (Hons)

Criminology with Psychology

Teaching & Learning

Combine the study of contemporary psychology and criminological theories and research, as you develop a critical appreciation of these two interlinked fields. You will hone your research methodology and understand how psychology and criminology inform debates over a multitude of social issues. The tabs below detail what and how you will study in each year of your course. The balance of assessments and overall workload will be informed by your core modules and the option modules you choose to study; the information provided is an indication of what you can expect and may be subject to change. The option modules listed are also an indication of what will be available to you. Their availability is subject to demand and you will be advised which option modules you can choose at the beginning of each year of study.

Due to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic we are currently unable to advise on the mode of teaching for September 2021, however we will keep you updated and provide more information as soon as we can. We continue to follow government guidance and your teaching and learning will reflect the restrictions in place at the time of delivery. We currently anticipate that you may experience a blended approach – this is a mix of face-to-face, on campus and online teaching and learning. You can keep up to date with teaching and learning at Leeds Beckett via our Covid-19 website. Updated course specifications will be available in August 2021. In the meantime, our existing course specifications are available.

What you'll learn

Understand what it means to be a criminologist as an academic discipline in an interesting context and explore its broad range of specialisms.
Explore the concepts and theories associated with psychosocial development and the interplay between these and the social, political and cultural forces in understanding crime.
Trace the development of criminology and elementary theory, looking at crime trends, social divisions and critiquing common sense assumptions about crime and deviance.
Learn about the criminal justice process within England & Wales; the actors and institutions that make up this system, along with some underlying social theories.
Discover the role of the individual psychology in modern offending and victimhood. Consider how psychology has been applied to offender rehabilitation and crime reduction.
Gain an awareness of the varied, conflicting and complimentary contributions of contemporary criminological theory to understanding crime, criminality and society.
Understand what it means to be a criminologist as an academic discipline in an interesting context and explore its broad range of specialisms.
Explore the concepts and theories associated with psychosocial development and the interplay between these and the social, political and cultural forces in understanding crime.
Trace the development of criminology and elementary theory, looking at crime trends, social divisions and critiquing common sense assumptions about crime and deviance.
Learn about the criminal justice process within England & Wales; the actors and institutions that make up this system, along with some underlying social theories.
Discover the role of the individual psychology in modern offending and victimhood. Consider how psychology has been applied to offender rehabilitation and crime reduction.
Gain an awareness of the varied, conflicting and complimentary contributions of contemporary criminological theory to understanding crime, criminality and society.

What you'll learn

Following on from the part 1 module, focus on quantitative research, looking at the main research methods and key statistical techniques.
Gain an informed and critical exploration of how social control is exercised in society, particularly through policing functions, focusing on elements of change and continuity.
Analyse theories in biological and cognitive psychology, and apply them to crime by looking at offending behaviour, treatment and offender rehabilitation and victims of crime.
Examine the main types of research design, with a focus on qualitative research, looking at the key techniques as well as ethical and safety considerations.
Following on from the part 1 module, focus on quantitative research, looking at the main research methods and key statistical techniques.
Gain an informed and critical exploration of how social control is exercised in society, particularly through policing functions, focusing on elements of change and continuity.
Analyse theories in biological and cognitive psychology, and apply them to crime by looking at offending behaviour, treatment and offender rehabilitation and victims of crime.
Examine the main types of research design, with a focus on qualitative research, looking at the key techniques as well as ethical and safety considerations.

Option modules may include

Study children, youth and crime by examining patterns of offending and desistance from crime amongst children and young people.
Gain a detailed knowledge of prisons, detention centres, immigration removal centres or any institution that houses people for punishment.
Gain theoretical and practical understanding of the nature of gender, crime and criminal justice in both domestic and international contexts.
Trace the historical, economic and social contexts wherein `race' and ethnicity come to be associated with crime, victimisation and disproportion in the criminal justice system.
Look at the relationship between crime, victims, harm and justice, and how victimisation is conceptualised within and out with the criminal justice system.
Consider the experience of vulnerable people within all areas of the criminal justice system including the police, courts, probation and the prison service. You will engage in critical debates about the criminal justice process and explore how each stage can impact on vulnerable groups including people with mental health difficulties, young people, older people, mothers and people with drug and alcohol dependency.
Understand the theoretical and applied knowledge underpinning crime science and criminalistics.
Discover what influences a person to commit serious and violent crime, delving into psychological explanations to analyse offender motivation.
Apply knowledge from the criminology of place to different sorts of urban neighbourhoods and cities to understand the problem of crime.
Explore the role that sociology has had in exploring the role, work and symbolism of police work, looking at the broad area of `police culture'.
Study children, youth and crime by examining patterns of offending and desistance from crime amongst children and young people.
Gain a detailed knowledge of prisons, detention centres, immigration removal centres or any institution that houses people for punishment.
Gain theoretical and practical understanding of the nature of gender, crime and criminal justice in both domestic and international contexts.
Trace the historical, economic and social contexts wherein `race' and ethnicity come to be associated with crime, victimisation and disproportion in the criminal justice system.
Look at the relationship between crime, victims, harm and justice, and how victimisation is conceptualised within and out with the criminal justice system.
Consider the experience of vulnerable people within all areas of the criminal justice system including the police, courts, probation and the prison service. You will engage in critical debates about the criminal justice process and explore how each stage can impact on vulnerable groups including people with mental health difficulties, young people, older people, mothers and people with drug and alcohol dependency.
Understand the theoretical and applied knowledge underpinning crime science and criminalistics.
Discover what influences a person to commit serious and violent crime, delving into psychological explanations to analyse offender motivation.
Apply knowledge from the criminology of place to different sorts of urban neighbourhoods and cities to understand the problem of crime.
Explore the role that sociology has had in exploring the role, work and symbolism of police work, looking at the broad area of `police culture'.

What you'll learn

Understand how psychological principles are applied to the investigation of criminal behaviour, the detection of crime and offenders, and people's responses to legal processes.
Develop an understanding in contemporary theoretical developments in criminology.
Design and develop a research project in criminology and carry out investigations within a chosen area of interest by collecting existing or generating new data.
Understand how psychological principles are applied to the investigation of criminal behaviour, the detection of crime and offenders, and people's responses to legal processes.
Develop an understanding in contemporary theoretical developments in criminology.
Design and develop a research project in criminology and carry out investigations within a chosen area of interest by collecting existing or generating new data.

Option modules may include

Engage with the development of criminal justice policies at a national and global level, drawing on sociological, social policy and socio-legal perspectives. You'll investigate the complex inter-relationships between theory, policy and practice in the field of criminal justice. You'll also be encouraged to evaluate different sources of knowledge about crime and criminal justice, and focus on the role of academic research in shaping and evaluating criminal justice policies.
Critically explore the complexities of the sex industry, with a particular focus on social control. You'll consider the motivations of both those who purchase sexual services and those who sell sex on and off street. To do this, you'll look at different theoretical understandings of sex work/prostitution and the way the industry is controlled in different geographical areas.
Taught at HMP Full Sutton as part of the Learning Together Network initiative, you will explore the core elements of penology with a specific focus on the philosophy of punishment, the prison as a total institution and prison sociology.
Discover the crimes that have shaped the 20th and 21st century, including war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide.
Examine the social-psychology of aggression and killing, and explore the types of aggression within social contexts i.e. individual face-to-face interactions and also overlooked large scale and sanctioned conflict contexts such as law enforcement, gang contexts and armed conflict settings.
Explore a range of competing explanations for gendered violence with a particular focus on domestic violence.
Study the historical and socially constructed nature of freedom, crime and criminality within the law. You'll look at examples of social movements that illuminate how the law itself is a field of contestation, including piracy, file sharing and poll tax rebellion.
Gain an overview of overview of abnormal and clinical psychology, and the complicated links between mental disorders, personality disorders, and crime.
Further your understanding of theory and analysis of crime through a critical analysis of the role of culture and literature.
Conduct a critical, sociological exploration of the prison - more specifically, the experience of imprisonment. You will deal with concepts such as time & liminality, renegotiations of identity and masculinities, coping, and negotiations of gender to unpack the implications of being in the prison environment on individual prisoners.
Look at the cultural and social relationship between tattoos and crime, including the symbolism of tattooing and criminal identity.
Gain a critical understanding of the lived experiences of individuals who are seeking support to stop offending and recover from substance abuse. You’ll explore the connections between theory, policy and practice, in order to support desistance and recovery, to reduce reoffending and improve resettlement.
Look into competing explanations for acts of violent and sexual offending in both domestic and institutional settings, touching on gender, ethnicity and age issues.
Engage with the development of criminal justice policies at a national and global level, drawing on sociological, social policy and socio-legal perspectives. You'll investigate the complex inter-relationships between theory, policy and practice in the field of criminal justice. You'll also be encouraged to evaluate different sources of knowledge about crime and criminal justice, and focus on the role of academic research in shaping and evaluating criminal justice policies.
Critically explore the complexities of the sex industry, with a particular focus on social control. You'll consider the motivations of both those who purchase sexual services and those who sell sex on and off street. To do this, you'll look at different theoretical understandings of sex work/prostitution and the way the industry is controlled in different geographical areas.
Taught at HMP Full Sutton as part of the Learning Together Network initiative, you will explore the core elements of penology with a specific focus on the philosophy of punishment, the prison as a total institution and prison sociology.
Discover the crimes that have shaped the 20th and 21st century, including war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide.
Examine the social-psychology of aggression and killing, and explore the types of aggression within social contexts i.e. individual face-to-face interactions and also overlooked large scale and sanctioned conflict contexts such as law enforcement, gang contexts and armed conflict settings.
Explore a range of competing explanations for gendered violence with a particular focus on domestic violence.
Study the historical and socially constructed nature of freedom, crime and criminality within the law. You'll look at examples of social movements that illuminate how the law itself is a field of contestation, including piracy, file sharing and poll tax rebellion.
Gain an overview of overview of abnormal and clinical psychology, and the complicated links between mental disorders, personality disorders, and crime.
Further your understanding of theory and analysis of crime through a critical analysis of the role of culture and literature.
Conduct a critical, sociological exploration of the prison - more specifically, the experience of imprisonment. You will deal with concepts such as time & liminality, renegotiations of identity and masculinities, coping, and negotiations of gender to unpack the implications of being in the prison environment on individual prisoners.
Look at the cultural and social relationship between tattoos and crime, including the symbolism of tattooing and criminal identity.
Gain a critical understanding of the lived experiences of individuals who are seeking support to stop offending and recover from substance abuse. You’ll explore the connections between theory, policy and practice, in order to support desistance and recovery, to reduce reoffending and improve resettlement.
Look into competing explanations for acts of violent and sexual offending in both domestic and institutional settings, touching on gender, ethnicity and age issues.