BA (Hons)

Educational Psychology

Teaching & Learning

Due to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic we are currently unable to advise on the mode of teaching for September 2021, however we will keep you updated and provide more information as soon as we can. We continue to follow government guidance and your teaching and learning will reflect the restrictions in place at the time of delivery. We currently anticipate that you may experience a blended approach – this is a mix of face-to-face, on campus and online teaching and learning. You can keep up to date with teaching and learning at Leeds Beckett via our Covid-19 website. Updated course specifications will be available in August 2021. In the meantime, our existing course specifications are available.

What you'll learn

This module will introduce you to the concept of education in its broadest sense, and encourage you to consider the impact of education on the individual. You'll study key philosophical frameworks which underpin formal, informal and non-formal educational settings as they exist in the modern day such as Perennialism, Essentialism, Progressivism and Reconstructionism. You'll consider the strengths and limitations of these approaches and discuss how they reflect different understandings of what it means to be educated in the UK.
Look at the concept of psychology as a science. You'll be introduced to the fundamental psychological theoretical frameworks as they are applied to education and learning. This module will focus on the following five areas of theory and research: biological, cognitive, developmental, social and individual differences. You'll explore the diversity of psychological perspectives and consider how they merge to best explain behaviour as observed in formal and informal educational settings.
Identify and understand how different learning needs present themselves in educational settings and impact upon the educational experience of pupils. This module will focus specifically on educational diversity and learners with special educational needs. You'll question traditional concepts of power differentials between teacher and learner, and consider the historical and contemporary perspectives on inclusive education in order to promote learner progress and experience.
Extend your knowledge of what the term 'education' means by exploring this within a global context. This module will ask you to consider and explore the interrelations between social, economic, cultural, political and environmental influences on the direct experience of the learner. You'll engage in key policy in order to consider the skills, attitudes and values which enable people to work together. This module will also look at the role that education can play in helping to create a more just and equitable society.
Focus on developing your skills for learning, for reading and undertaking research at undergraduate level. You'll gain an understanding of the purpose of and approaches to psychological and educational research and an understanding of the impact of research on policy and practice. This module will consider the contexts and ethics of research, and will teach the art of forming research questions, searching the literature and reviewing. You'll also be introduced to the concepts of quantitative and qualitative research design, with a focus on identifying when such approaches are useful.
This module will introduce you to the concept of education in its broadest sense, and encourage you to consider the impact of education on the individual. You'll study key philosophical frameworks which underpin formal, informal and non-formal educational settings as they exist in the modern day such as Perennialism, Essentialism, Progressivism and Reconstructionism. You'll consider the strengths and limitations of these approaches and discuss how they reflect different understandings of what it means to be educated in the UK.
Look at the concept of psychology as a science. You'll be introduced to the fundamental psychological theoretical frameworks as they are applied to education and learning. This module will focus on the following five areas of theory and research: biological, cognitive, developmental, social and individual differences. You'll explore the diversity of psychological perspectives and consider how they merge to best explain behaviour as observed in formal and informal educational settings.
Identify and understand how different learning needs present themselves in educational settings and impact upon the educational experience of pupils. This module will focus specifically on educational diversity and learners with special educational needs. You'll question traditional concepts of power differentials between teacher and learner, and consider the historical and contemporary perspectives on inclusive education in order to promote learner progress and experience.
Extend your knowledge of what the term 'education' means by exploring this within a global context. This module will ask you to consider and explore the interrelations between social, economic, cultural, political and environmental influences on the direct experience of the learner. You'll engage in key policy in order to consider the skills, attitudes and values which enable people to work together. This module will also look at the role that education can play in helping to create a more just and equitable society.
Focus on developing your skills for learning, for reading and undertaking research at undergraduate level. You'll gain an understanding of the purpose of and approaches to psychological and educational research and an understanding of the impact of research on policy and practice. This module will consider the contexts and ethics of research, and will teach the art of forming research questions, searching the literature and reviewing. You'll also be introduced to the concepts of quantitative and qualitative research design, with a focus on identifying when such approaches are useful.

What you'll learn

Explore the psychological meaning and consequences of the word 'normal' when applied to children and adolescents. Using the theoretical lens of labelling theory, you'll learn about the historical context of current diagnostic criteria. You'll examine key historical case studies and use knowledge of the existence of individual variation in common disorders in order to question the traditional medical model of treatment. This module will enable you to analyse the meaning of the word ‘normal’ and investigate the real-world impact of this label on the individual and their subsequent access to resources.
Develop your understanding of the underlying biological, cognitive and behavioural processes involved in learning. You'll draw on theoretical perspectives and current research from neuroscience, psychology and education to gain an knowledge of how biology and the environment interact to influence the learning experience. You'll study the techniques required for collecting neurobiological data, and identify how these methods translate into the traditional assessments used within educational settings, and identify students who might need further support. This module will encourage you to consider the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches and to identify a range of practical implications.
Draw on the theory around resilience within an educational context. This module will enable you to explore the psychological, behavioural and biological effects of neglect and abuse. You'll be encouraged to question how adverse childhood experiences are used as a method for predicting child developmental outcomes. You'll also discuss school-level policy and safeguarding techniques as a means of building resilience within schools. You'll look at different strategies that are used to encourage parents and educators to support children in building resilience. This module will also consider the utility of a whole systems approach, including the importance of a multidisciplinary team, for the purpose of enhancing child health and wellbeing.
This module will consider the role of the school as a setting for a child’s identity development. You'll reflect on traditional psychological models of identity formation and, consider the interrelation between race, religion, gender, sexuality on personal, social and school-related identity dimensions. This module will use contemporary policy and research to develop your knowledge of the power dynamic between teachers and pupils, and pupils and their peers and how this relates to identity development. Key case studies will be used to consider models of best practice to build secure identities which empower pupils. You'll explore the wider implications for pupils and teachers when children and adolescents experience difficulties in identity formation.
Learn how to prepare reports and assess the strengths and weaknesses of educational and psychological research with critical analysis, understanding and insight. You'll develop deeper knowledge and advanced research skills as well as basic descriptive and inferential statistic skills. You'll learn how to use database software packages such as SPSS to conduct quantitative data analysis through a range of practical lab sessions. This module will also develop your understanding of the mechanisms of qualitative analysis skills via software packages. On completion, you'll be prepared to carry out independent research on topics in psychology in education in your third year of study.
Explore the psychological meaning and consequences of the word 'normal' when applied to children and adolescents. Using the theoretical lens of labelling theory, you'll learn about the historical context of current diagnostic criteria. You'll examine key historical case studies and use knowledge of the existence of individual variation in common disorders in order to question the traditional medical model of treatment. This module will enable you to analyse the meaning of the word ‘normal’ and investigate the real-world impact of this label on the individual and their subsequent access to resources.
Develop your understanding of the underlying biological, cognitive and behavioural processes involved in learning. You'll draw on theoretical perspectives and current research from neuroscience, psychology and education to gain an knowledge of how biology and the environment interact to influence the learning experience. You'll study the techniques required for collecting neurobiological data, and identify how these methods translate into the traditional assessments used within educational settings, and identify students who might need further support. This module will encourage you to consider the advantages and disadvantages of these approaches and to identify a range of practical implications.
Draw on the theory around resilience within an educational context. This module will enable you to explore the psychological, behavioural and biological effects of neglect and abuse. You'll be encouraged to question how adverse childhood experiences are used as a method for predicting child developmental outcomes. You'll also discuss school-level policy and safeguarding techniques as a means of building resilience within schools. You'll look at different strategies that are used to encourage parents and educators to support children in building resilience. This module will also consider the utility of a whole systems approach, including the importance of a multidisciplinary team, for the purpose of enhancing child health and wellbeing.
This module will consider the role of the school as a setting for a child’s identity development. You'll reflect on traditional psychological models of identity formation and, consider the interrelation between race, religion, gender, sexuality on personal, social and school-related identity dimensions. This module will use contemporary policy and research to develop your knowledge of the power dynamic between teachers and pupils, and pupils and their peers and how this relates to identity development. Key case studies will be used to consider models of best practice to build secure identities which empower pupils. You'll explore the wider implications for pupils and teachers when children and adolescents experience difficulties in identity formation.
Learn how to prepare reports and assess the strengths and weaknesses of educational and psychological research with critical analysis, understanding and insight. You'll develop deeper knowledge and advanced research skills as well as basic descriptive and inferential statistic skills. You'll learn how to use database software packages such as SPSS to conduct quantitative data analysis through a range of practical lab sessions. This module will also develop your understanding of the mechanisms of qualitative analysis skills via software packages. On completion, you'll be prepared to carry out independent research on topics in psychology in education in your third year of study.

What you'll learn

Begin to develop a holistic overview of school-wide ethos and approaches for enhancing the mental health of all staff and pupils. This module will require you to engage with and draw links between theory, policy, research, and practice to understand the design and implementation of school-wide interventions. You'll consider the utility of long-term interventions that are embedded within the curriculum and discuss teaching as a mechanism for change that can be enhanced by the provision of effective training and development. This module will introduce you to evidence-based rating standards, and how these are used by policy makers to make decisions regarding the allocation of resources within educational settings. You'll be able to identify the difference between universal and targeted interventions and will acquire knowledge of how these programmes relate to traditional psychological theory. You'll be encouraged to further question the medical model of child mental health and consider the importance of a community-based approach that engages outside agencies to promote healthy and happy schools.
Study a range of psychological assessment commonly used in educational psychology settings. You'll be encouraged to consider the links between an assessment tool's theoretical underpinning, construction and desired outcome. Key concepts of measurement reliability and validity will be considered. You'll explore the key concepts in-line with the advantages and disadvantages of a range of assessment types i.e. observation, questionnaires and practitioner administered tests. You'll be taught the key skills required to administer a psychological assessment with competency in real-world settings and will learn how to compile a final case report accuracy and objectivity that includes recommendations for follow-up following assessment.
Consider contemporary debates surrounding the use of digital technology as a learning tool, and the impact of social media use on learning and developmental outcomes. You'll investigate the position and responsibility of society in keeping children and adolescents safe online. You'll also learn how to navigate through the legal and moral issues educators and primary caregivers face. As part of this module, you'll critique the current infrastructure of support available to users of digital technology and make recommendations for improvement. You'll critically examine government policy in relation to safer use of the internet, and also the benefits of technology to children and young people, including the role of social media in supporting identity development. A variety of other themes will be considered including body image, self-harm, cyberbullying, social connectivity, digital citizenship, digital literacy and digital responsibility.
Develop your critical thinking around current movements and trends in research and the potential impact this will have on educational provision. You'll focus on the history of genetic research and engage in contemporary and historical literature in order to debate, discuss, and seek resolution for the potential positioning of the genetic movement within current and future educational settings.
Prepare to undertake independent learning in an area that has been of particular personal interest. Your research project will be the culmination of your work across the course and will enable you to develop your chosen topic. Throughout the module you'll take a lead on all aspects of the research project including writing a literature review, the methodology, designing the research tools, conducting the research and reporting the findings. You'll be guided throughout your project by a research supervisor.
Begin to develop a holistic overview of school-wide ethos and approaches for enhancing the mental health of all staff and pupils. This module will require you to engage with and draw links between theory, policy, research, and practice to understand the design and implementation of school-wide interventions. You'll consider the utility of long-term interventions that are embedded within the curriculum and discuss teaching as a mechanism for change that can be enhanced by the provision of effective training and development. This module will introduce you to evidence-based rating standards, and how these are used by policy makers to make decisions regarding the allocation of resources within educational settings. You'll be able to identify the difference between universal and targeted interventions and will acquire knowledge of how these programmes relate to traditional psychological theory. You'll be encouraged to further question the medical model of child mental health and consider the importance of a community-based approach that engages outside agencies to promote healthy and happy schools.
Study a range of psychological assessment commonly used in educational psychology settings. You'll be encouraged to consider the links between an assessment tool's theoretical underpinning, construction and desired outcome. Key concepts of measurement reliability and validity will be considered. You'll explore the key concepts in-line with the advantages and disadvantages of a range of assessment types i.e. observation, questionnaires and practitioner administered tests. You'll be taught the key skills required to administer a psychological assessment with competency in real-world settings and will learn how to compile a final case report accuracy and objectivity that includes recommendations for follow-up following assessment.
Consider contemporary debates surrounding the use of digital technology as a learning tool, and the impact of social media use on learning and developmental outcomes. You'll investigate the position and responsibility of society in keeping children and adolescents safe online. You'll also learn how to navigate through the legal and moral issues educators and primary caregivers face. As part of this module, you'll critique the current infrastructure of support available to users of digital technology and make recommendations for improvement. You'll critically examine government policy in relation to safer use of the internet, and also the benefits of technology to children and young people, including the role of social media in supporting identity development. A variety of other themes will be considered including body image, self-harm, cyberbullying, social connectivity, digital citizenship, digital literacy and digital responsibility.
Develop your critical thinking around current movements and trends in research and the potential impact this will have on educational provision. You'll focus on the history of genetic research and engage in contemporary and historical literature in order to debate, discuss, and seek resolution for the potential positioning of the genetic movement within current and future educational settings.
Prepare to undertake independent learning in an area that has been of particular personal interest. Your research project will be the culmination of your work across the course and will enable you to develop your chosen topic. Throughout the module you'll take a lead on all aspects of the research project including writing a literature review, the methodology, designing the research tools, conducting the research and reporting the findings. You'll be guided throughout your project by a research supervisor.