Master of Laws

International Law: Conflict, Security and Human Rights

Teaching & Learning

Distance learning

We understand that full-time study does not suit everyone. That’s why we offer courses which give you the opportunity to decide where, when and how you can get involved in learning. Studying a distance learning course offers the convenience and flexibility to make education work for you. Whether you’d like to fit your studies around childcare, develop your skills while working or, quite simply, want to learn from the comfort of your own home, we can help you gain a qualification at a time and pace that suits your lifestyle.

Like our students on campus, you will have the same excellent teaching and learning resources, however you’ll find these online instead of a lecture theatre. Not only are all the modules taught online, but you will also have access to an online community and more than 140,000 books and journals in our online library.

To study this course, you will require broadband internet connection with a speed of 2mbps and working speakers. You will need Windows 7 / Mac OSX 10.8 or above and have access to Chrome v64=3 or higher (recommended). Edge v42+, Firefox v57+ or Safari v6+. Java and Adobe Reader will need to be enabled and you will need a minimum screen resolution of 1024 x 768.

Complete technical requirements are detail in the full guide. Visit our distance learning website

What you'll learn

Explore how the concepts of democracy, rule of law and human rights have evolved to underpin the modern international political and legal order. You'll examine whether these concepts are robust enough to cope with contemporary economic and political challenges.
Gain in-depth knowledge of various terrorist causes in the context of state security and human rights. You'll evaluate key debates related to countering terrorist and extremist activity in the area of national and international legislation, policy and practice.
Study the 'forgotten trials' of the Holocaust and the associated crimes: war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide. You'll look at how prosecutors approached the charges and the way that the perpetrators of the Holocaust were dealt with in national courtrooms. You'll also explore the significance of testimony and identify the way that public memory of the Holocaust has been shaped.
Produce an independent research project of between 15,000 and 18,000 words. This will allow you to develop your ideas on a legal topic which you've chosen to explore in-depth. You'll be supported in your dissertation research and writing process by an academic supervisor.
This module takes a socio-legal approach to the study of minority rights, statelessness and indigenous peoples in the context of domestic and international law. You'll critically address the potential for domestic and cross border conflict arising from violations of minority rights. This will include the abuse of rights of indigenous peoples, and related legal issues of statelessness.
Study key debates in international relations with a focus on the conceptualisation of human rights. You'll explore the tensions that emerge through the institutionalisation of rights at an international level, the operation of sovereignty and the politics of rights at a group and individual level.
Gain an understanding of the environmental dilemmas that confront us in the contemporary world. This module will help you develop a broader socio-cultural understanding of production that 'de-naturalises' the way we view and exploit the natural world. It also aims to throw light on the tension between economics and the environment given the framework of an unequal world market.
Explore how the concepts of democracy, rule of law and human rights have evolved to underpin the modern international political and legal order. You'll examine whether these concepts are robust enough to cope with contemporary economic and political challenges.
Gain in-depth knowledge of various terrorist causes in the context of state security and human rights. You'll evaluate key debates related to countering terrorist and extremist activity in the area of national and international legislation, policy and practice.
Study the 'forgotten trials' of the Holocaust and the associated crimes: war crimes, crimes against humanity, and genocide. You'll look at how prosecutors approached the charges and the way that the perpetrators of the Holocaust were dealt with in national courtrooms. You'll also explore the significance of testimony and identify the way that public memory of the Holocaust has been shaped.
Produce an independent research project of between 15,000 and 18,000 words. This will allow you to develop your ideas on a legal topic which you've chosen to explore in-depth. You'll be supported in your dissertation research and writing process by an academic supervisor.
This module takes a socio-legal approach to the study of minority rights, statelessness and indigenous peoples in the context of domestic and international law. You'll critically address the potential for domestic and cross border conflict arising from violations of minority rights. This will include the abuse of rights of indigenous peoples, and related legal issues of statelessness.
Study key debates in international relations with a focus on the conceptualisation of human rights. You'll explore the tensions that emerge through the institutionalisation of rights at an international level, the operation of sovereignty and the politics of rights at a group and individual level.
Gain an understanding of the environmental dilemmas that confront us in the contemporary world. This module will help you develop a broader socio-cultural understanding of production that 'de-naturalises' the way we view and exploit the natural world. It also aims to throw light on the tension between economics and the environment given the framework of an unequal world market.