MA

Social History

Teaching & Learning

 

Due to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic we are currently unable to advise on the mode of teaching for September 2021, however we will keep you updated and provide more information as soon as we can. We continue to follow government guidance and your teaching and learning will reflect the restrictions in place at the time of delivery. We currently anticipate that you may experience a blended approach – this is a mix of face-to-face, on campus and online teaching and learning. You can keep up to date with teaching and learning at Leeds Beckett via our Covid-19 website. Updated course specifications will be available in August 2021. In the meantime, our existing course specifications are available.

What you'll learn

This is an introduction to the theories and methods that are core to historical research. You'll study research skills and methods, exploring libraries, sources, archives and treatments of history using case studies. You will analyse the relationships between literary texts, historical documents, and films, as well as scrutinising how events have been recorded, historicised, fictionalised and dramatised.
Undertake a sustained piece of research in social history on a topic selected by yourself and involving the use of both primary and secondary sources. You will design, plan, manage and complete a sustained research project, presenting your findings both orally and in writing.
This is an introduction to the theories and methods that are core to historical research. You'll study research skills and methods, exploring libraries, sources, archives and treatments of history using case studies. You will analyse the relationships between literary texts, historical documents, and films, as well as scrutinising how events have been recorded, historicised, fictionalised and dramatised.
Undertake a sustained piece of research in social history on a topic selected by yourself and involving the use of both primary and secondary sources. You will design, plan, manage and complete a sustained research project, presenting your findings both orally and in writing.

What you'll learn

Over the last 30 years, there has been an increased interest in life writings, or 'documents of life', which include autobiographies and biographies, diaries, letters, testimonies and oral histories. You will explore questions concerning authenticity, memory, narrative and moral authority and their implications for the use of life writings as historical sources.
Examine urbanisation and metropolitan cultures of the cities within Europe during the second-half of the 20th Century. We will ask you to consider the relationship between cities and the social, economic, political and cultural policies of local, national and supranational governments and other governing bodies.
Study the emergence of celebrity culture in Europe and North America. You'll consider the extent to which modern theories of celebrity can be applied to historic contexts, and we will encourage you to engage with a range of non-traditional source materials, including photographs and other material objects.
Bringing together recent research in environmental history and the histories of food and eating, you'll look at how food has been grown, transported and consumed in the western world since the Columbian Exchange of 1492.
Consider journeys, voyages and discoveries as recounted in travel journals, guidebooks, colonial texts, memoirs, fiction, letters and ethnographic studies. You will consider these representations against the backdrop of the histories of travel, tourism and exploration.
Combine the study of social, cultural and environmental history to explore the changing relationship between people and their environments. You will focus on the United States, Europe and European settler societies over the last two centuries.
Throughout history, as societies have become more organised, so too have their criminals. You'll study a range of criminal organisations, exploring the role organised crime has played in both shaping and reacting to the ebb and flow of power and socio-economic development in the modern world.
Use pastiches, rewritings and parodies of the 19th-Century novel to consider how we are 'other Victorians' and the role of the 'other' in Victorian society.
According to some theorists, a preoccupation with sexuality is one of the defining features of Western modernity. You'll explore current debates, relevant theoretical approaches and will be introduced to a range of source material including newspaper reports, film and popular literature.
Study the representation of crime, criminals and police during a period which witnessed key changes in the criminal justice system, the rise of a policed society, and the emergence of print culture.
Examine the changing nature of public history since the mid-20th Century. You'll explore specific case studies and learn about the skills and resources used by public historians.
Drawing on local and national collections, you will discover that studying material culture can illuminate the social and cultural life of the long 18th Century (c.1688/9-1830s).
Consider the history and historiography of modern technology in societies and cultures under colonial rule. You'll examine the role of technology in imperial rule, attitudes and practices concerning technology and the changes that ensued, and technologies, societies and cultures under imperial rule. This module will explore how modern mechanical technologies became everyday goods: how they were disseminated, adopted, resisted, or adapted in societies and cultures under colonial rule. You'll consider how people viewed, used and even abused these technologies to understand their role in the wider social and cultural changes taking place under colonial rule: changes, for example, in social classes, gender and gender practices, race and ethnicity or emerging nationalist ideas.
Over the last 30 years, there has been an increased interest in life writings, or 'documents of life', which include autobiographies and biographies, diaries, letters, testimonies and oral histories. You will explore questions concerning authenticity, memory, narrative and moral authority and their implications for the use of life writings as historical sources.
Examine urbanisation and metropolitan cultures of the cities within Europe during the second-half of the 20th Century. We will ask you to consider the relationship between cities and the social, economic, political and cultural policies of local, national and supranational governments and other governing bodies.
Study the emergence of celebrity culture in Europe and North America. You'll consider the extent to which modern theories of celebrity can be applied to historic contexts, and we will encourage you to engage with a range of non-traditional source materials, including photographs and other material objects.
Bringing together recent research in environmental history and the histories of food and eating, you'll look at how food has been grown, transported and consumed in the western world since the Columbian Exchange of 1492.
Consider journeys, voyages and discoveries as recounted in travel journals, guidebooks, colonial texts, memoirs, fiction, letters and ethnographic studies. You will consider these representations against the backdrop of the histories of travel, tourism and exploration.
Combine the study of social, cultural and environmental history to explore the changing relationship between people and their environments. You will focus on the United States, Europe and European settler societies over the last two centuries.
Throughout history, as societies have become more organised, so too have their criminals. You'll study a range of criminal organisations, exploring the role organised crime has played in both shaping and reacting to the ebb and flow of power and socio-economic development in the modern world.
Use pastiches, rewritings and parodies of the 19th-Century novel to consider how we are 'other Victorians' and the role of the 'other' in Victorian society.
According to some theorists, a preoccupation with sexuality is one of the defining features of Western modernity. You'll explore current debates, relevant theoretical approaches and will be introduced to a range of source material including newspaper reports, film and popular literature.
Study the representation of crime, criminals and police during a period which witnessed key changes in the criminal justice system, the rise of a policed society, and the emergence of print culture.
Examine the changing nature of public history since the mid-20th Century. You'll explore specific case studies and learn about the skills and resources used by public historians.
Drawing on local and national collections, you will discover that studying material culture can illuminate the social and cultural life of the long 18th Century (c.1688/9-1830s).
Consider the history and historiography of modern technology in societies and cultures under colonial rule. You'll examine the role of technology in imperial rule, attitudes and practices concerning technology and the changes that ensued, and technologies, societies and cultures under imperial rule. This module will explore how modern mechanical technologies became everyday goods: how they were disseminated, adopted, resisted, or adapted in societies and cultures under colonial rule. You'll consider how people viewed, used and even abused these technologies to understand their role in the wider social and cultural changes taking place under colonial rule: changes, for example, in social classes, gender and gender practices, race and ethnicity or emerging nationalist ideas.