BSc (Hons)

Geography

Teaching & Learning

 

Due to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic we are currently unable to advise on the mode of teaching for September 2021, however we will keep you updated and provide more information as soon as we can. We continue to follow government guidance and your teaching and learning will reflect the restrictions in place at the time of delivery. We currently anticipate that you may experience a blended approach – this is a mix of face-to-face, on campus and online teaching and learning. You can keep up to date with teaching and learning at Leeds Beckett via our Covid-19 website. Updated course specifications will be available in August 2021.

What you'll learn

Gain an understanding of how to apply principles of sustainability to cities and the other urban places we live in, learning how cities are dealing with the threat of climate change. You will take a field trip to a European city to examine how the city has incorporated aspects of best practice in its attempt to adopt elements of sustainable urbanism.
Through case studies of a series of contemporary events and media prominent in the public domain, you will learn the importance of the geographical discipline in understanding the world we live in.
Gain an understanding of the origins of the earth, and of key environmental systems, such as the atmosphere. You will study concepts of geomorphology to understand the origins of the earth’s landforms and how landscapes evolve in the context of long-term environmental change.
Examine the impact of global, national and local urban policies on the development of cities and how they are shaped both physically and environmentally.
This is an applied project-based module. You will build on some of the core geographical and planning content from Semester 1 and learn to apply this knowledge in the context of two fieldwork projects.
Learn, practice, and explore some of the fundamental study skills that you will be using on a daily basis during your time at Leeds Beckett. You will build employability skills which will continue to be developed through your year two placement module, ensuring you are in the best possible position to embark on a successful professional career when you graduate.
This module provides an introduction to environmental science and global environmental issues, with particular reference to the science underpinning the control of air, noise and water pollution.
Gain an understanding of how to apply principles of sustainability to cities and the other urban places we live in, learning how cities are dealing with the threat of climate change. You will take a field trip to a European city to examine how the city has incorporated aspects of best practice in its attempt to adopt elements of sustainable urbanism.
Through case studies of a series of contemporary events and media prominent in the public domain, you will learn the importance of the geographical discipline in understanding the world we live in.
Gain an understanding of the origins of the earth, and of key environmental systems, such as the atmosphere. You will study concepts of geomorphology to understand the origins of the earth’s landforms and how landscapes evolve in the context of long-term environmental change.
Examine the impact of global, national and local urban policies on the development of cities and how they are shaped both physically and environmentally.
This is an applied project-based module. You will build on some of the core geographical and planning content from Semester 1 and learn to apply this knowledge in the context of two fieldwork projects.
Learn, practice, and explore some of the fundamental study skills that you will be using on a daily basis during your time at Leeds Beckett. You will build employability skills which will continue to be developed through your year two placement module, ensuring you are in the best possible position to embark on a successful professional career when you graduate.
This module provides an introduction to environmental science and global environmental issues, with particular reference to the science underpinning the control of air, noise and water pollution.

What you'll learn

Develop your employability skills through a ten-week work placement supported by a series of taught sessions. You will build subject specific, graduate employability and intellectual and cognitive skills, develop your professional skills and learn how to reflect on what transferable skills you need for your chosen career.
With increased population, human activities and other natural impacts such as climate change transforming the environment, it is important to understand the factors that determine the abundance and distribution of species and their interactions in their environment. This module covers a range of fundamental topics in ecology, focusing on processes at different scales (individual, population, community and ecosystem). You will examine case studies which employ ecological principles to global challenges such as food security and biodiversity loss.
This module provides an introduction to remote sensing and the types of data generated, with consideration given to digital image acquisition, land observation satellites such as Landsat and the use of LIDAR for terrain mapping. You will cover data import into Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and consider the range of geographical and environmental applications to which it can be put.
Develop an understanding of the theoretical background to the carrying out of research and foster the practical skills to be able to carry out research in the social sciences using a number of different research methods.
Explore the causes of natural hazard vulnerability (e.g. in relation to flood risk), conducting fieldwork and gathering evidence to evaluate key strategies in natural hazard management. You will be introduced to key theories and frameworks and use these to evaluate a range of alternative pathways to climate change adaption.
Building on the knowledge you have gained during the Sustainable Places and City & Society modules; you will explore how changing complex urban problems are addressed in the UK and internationally through policy and practical responses.
This module builds on the year one Introduction to Physical Geography module to examine earth surface processes and geomorphology in more detail. You will cover key geomorphological concepts and look at the relationship between earth surface processes and landforms. You will also gain hands-on experience of a number of earth surface processes as you carry out a small-scale field-based research project.
Develop your employability skills through a ten-week work placement supported by a series of taught sessions. You will build subject specific, graduate employability and intellectual and cognitive skills, develop your professional skills and learn how to reflect on what transferable skills you need for your chosen career.
With increased population, human activities and other natural impacts such as climate change transforming the environment, it is important to understand the factors that determine the abundance and distribution of species and their interactions in their environment. This module covers a range of fundamental topics in ecology, focusing on processes at different scales (individual, population, community and ecosystem). You will examine case studies which employ ecological principles to global challenges such as food security and biodiversity loss.
This module provides an introduction to remote sensing and the types of data generated, with consideration given to digital image acquisition, land observation satellites such as Landsat and the use of LIDAR for terrain mapping. You will cover data import into Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and consider the range of geographical and environmental applications to which it can be put.
Develop an understanding of the theoretical background to the carrying out of research and foster the practical skills to be able to carry out research in the social sciences using a number of different research methods.
Explore the causes of natural hazard vulnerability (e.g. in relation to flood risk), conducting fieldwork and gathering evidence to evaluate key strategies in natural hazard management. You will be introduced to key theories and frameworks and use these to evaluate a range of alternative pathways to climate change adaption.
Building on the knowledge you have gained during the Sustainable Places and City & Society modules; you will explore how changing complex urban problems are addressed in the UK and internationally through policy and practical responses.
This module builds on the year one Introduction to Physical Geography module to examine earth surface processes and geomorphology in more detail. You will cover key geomorphological concepts and look at the relationship between earth surface processes and landforms. You will also gain hands-on experience of a number of earth surface processes as you carry out a small-scale field-based research project.

What you'll learn

Use the research methods, techniques and skills you have gained during your degree to carry out a sustained piece of research that examines current issues or problems in the fields of human geography and/or planning.
Water is crucial for human civilisation. The supply and use of water are threatened by climate change and human use. The supply and distribution of water as a sustainable resource is changing rapidly; you will explore both the threats to water management and some of the projects and solutions that offer sustainable management strategies at local and global levels.
Explore the physical processes that operate within coastal environments at a range of temporal and spatial scales, covering such issues as coastal geomorphology, sea-level change, societal interaction with coastal environments and near-shore environments. You will study theoretical aspects of coastal environments as well as engaging with more practical activities.
Use the research methods, techniques and skills you have gained during your degree to carry out a sustained piece of research that examines current issues or problems in the fields of human geography and/or planning.
Water is crucial for human civilisation. The supply and use of water are threatened by climate change and human use. The supply and distribution of water as a sustainable resource is changing rapidly; you will explore both the threats to water management and some of the projects and solutions that offer sustainable management strategies at local and global levels.
Explore the physical processes that operate within coastal environments at a range of temporal and spatial scales, covering such issues as coastal geomorphology, sea-level change, societal interaction with coastal environments and near-shore environments. You will study theoretical aspects of coastal environments as well as engaging with more practical activities.

Option modules may include

Examine the emerging policy debates about the ways cities are and should be evolving. You will focus on key dynamics, including the urban form of cities and the pressures of population growth, sustainability, governance and the search for global competitiveness.
Explore the different spaces and geographies of consumption, in terms of place identity, networks of retail and consumption, and commodity chains on a local, national and international level.
Examine the main trends and challenges facing cities, as well as the range of alternative practices which are being discussed within academic literature and experimented with directly by urban inhabitants.
Develop your critical understanding and knowledge of heritage conservation theory and practice and its relation to urban regeneration and renaissance in the UK.
Examine the relationship between women and the built environment, thinking about women as designers, planners and builders. You will also look at the spaces inhabited by women, those designed for them, and those adopted by them.
Develop a critical understanding of the theoretical, technical and legal principles underpinning policies and strategies for controlling the impact of pollution on the environment and public health.
Examine the emerging policy debates about the ways cities are and should be evolving. You will focus on key dynamics, including the urban form of cities and the pressures of population growth, sustainability, governance and the search for global competitiveness.
Explore the different spaces and geographies of consumption, in terms of place identity, networks of retail and consumption, and commodity chains on a local, national and international level.
Examine the main trends and challenges facing cities, as well as the range of alternative practices which are being discussed within academic literature and experimented with directly by urban inhabitants.
Develop your critical understanding and knowledge of heritage conservation theory and practice and its relation to urban regeneration and renaissance in the UK.
Examine the relationship between women and the built environment, thinking about women as designers, planners and builders. You will also look at the spaces inhabited by women, those designed for them, and those adopted by them.
Develop a critical understanding of the theoretical, technical and legal principles underpinning policies and strategies for controlling the impact of pollution on the environment and public health.