MA

English Literature

Teaching & Learning

The modules in teaching blocks two and three will be pre-selected by staff for each pathway. This decision will be made on the basis of staff availability, coherence of learning programme, and diversity of assessment.

What you'll learn

You will focus on the 1990s and 2000s - including the US-led globalisation project, the spread of global markets, the dotcom crash, 9/11 attacks on America and the bursting of the housing bubble.
Since the millennium, novels that imagine the end of the world as we know it have become increasingly popular. This module will examine a number of contemporary apocalyptic fictions in the context of the much wider apocalyptic trend amongst contemporary philosophers, political commentators and journalists. You will begin by tracing the history of apocalyptic thinking in western culture. You will then examine the key issues that motivate the apocalypse in contemporary fiction, including climate change, globalisation, corporatisation and the unchecked excesses of technoscience. The module will also assess the extent to which issues of difference and social inequality, including ‘race’, ethnicity, sexuality and gender inflect imaginative visions of the apocalypse in fiction in different ways.
You will focus on the 1990s and 2000s - including the US-led globalisation project, the spread of global markets, the dotcom crash, 9/11 attacks on America and the bursting of the housing bubble.
Since the millennium, novels that imagine the end of the world as we know it have become increasingly popular. This module will examine a number of contemporary apocalyptic fictions in the context of the much wider apocalyptic trend amongst contemporary philosophers, political commentators and journalists. You will begin by tracing the history of apocalyptic thinking in western culture. You will then examine the key issues that motivate the apocalypse in contemporary fiction, including climate change, globalisation, corporatisation and the unchecked excesses of technoscience. The module will also assess the extent to which issues of difference and social inequality, including ‘race’, ethnicity, sexuality and gender inflect imaginative visions of the apocalypse in fiction in different ways.

What you'll learn

The ethos of this module centres on aspects of socio-cultural diversity in relation to voice, and how this shapes the writer’s perceptions of their emerging voice. The module will promote both awareness and agency by asking you to ‘write back’ to influential texts in which elements of oppression or exclusion have been identified. You will then be guided in creatively critiquing both literary and non-literary texts. The module will use creative practices to expose key questions in relation to marginalised identities and its emphasis on the production of non-fiction texts will expand the range of writing forms with which you engage on the course.
This module will introduce you to range of techniques, processes, concepts, and approaches relating to rewriting, adapting and reimagining. In the space of the workshop, you will develop advanced skills of creative response and collaborative working crucial to the development of their learning in creative writing at masters level.
The ethos of this module centres on aspects of socio-cultural diversity in relation to voice, and how this shapes the writer’s perceptions of their emerging voice. The module will promote both awareness and agency by asking you to ‘write back’ to influential texts in which elements of oppression or exclusion have been identified. You will then be guided in creatively critiquing both literary and non-literary texts. The module will use creative practices to expose key questions in relation to marginalised identities and its emphasis on the production of non-fiction texts will expand the range of writing forms with which you engage on the course.
This module will introduce you to range of techniques, processes, concepts, and approaches relating to rewriting, adapting and reimagining. In the space of the workshop, you will develop advanced skills of creative response and collaborative working crucial to the development of their learning in creative writing at masters level.

What you'll learn

This module will introduce you to a range of recent developments in the theoretical landscape of English literary studies and also to emerging methodologies of creative criticism. In weekly workshops, you will explore various themes and concerns in the discipline through a series of creative-critical interventions. This module will orient you as a postgraduate-level thinker and writer by sampling some of the main areas of study (theory and method) that will be pursued in-depth in specialist modules, and which might be further explored in your extended project. Besides introducing these subject-specific skills, the module will develop your ability to reflect on and evaluate your learning experience.
In this module you will reflect on the relationship between the study and practice of English literature and the development of professional skills. You write and present an application to undertake a substantial project of your design as preparation for the semester 3 module, Major Project. Introductory workshops will outline objective-setting in a professional context as well as methodologies of reflective practice. Initial project design will be undertaken in consultation with a tutor, before you organise an event to present your project plans, and then complete a formal application, drawing upon prior knowledge and skills identified and refined in this module.
Analyse volumes of recently published poetry (2009-12) and consider them alongside a range of influential contemporary statements on the genre including pieces by Martin Heidegger and Jacques Derrida.
This module will introduce a range of post-millennial Anglophone Caribbean texts. You'll discuss topics such as how the form and themes of the texts are shaped around music, and whether contemporary Caribbean writers are still responding to postcolonial concerns or if they attempt to untether themselves from the label of the 'postcolonial'. The module will develop your capacity to share ideas and articulate arguments verbally, in particular through oral presentations and group work, and in creative and academic writing.
This module will enable you to undertake a sustained piece of research, or research and creative practice, in English Literature on a topic selected by themselves. Your progress will be overseen by an individual tutor. The particularities of the project, including its topic and its balance of creative, critical, and reflective writing, will be determined in tutorial discussion.
This module will introduce you to a range of recent developments in the theoretical landscape of English literary studies and also to emerging methodologies of creative criticism. In weekly workshops, you will explore various themes and concerns in the discipline through a series of creative-critical interventions. This module will orient you as a postgraduate-level thinker and writer by sampling some of the main areas of study (theory and method) that will be pursued in-depth in specialist modules, and which might be further explored in your extended project. Besides introducing these subject-specific skills, the module will develop your ability to reflect on and evaluate your learning experience.
In this module you will reflect on the relationship between the study and practice of English literature and the development of professional skills. You write and present an application to undertake a substantial project of your design as preparation for the semester 3 module, Major Project. Introductory workshops will outline objective-setting in a professional context as well as methodologies of reflective practice. Initial project design will be undertaken in consultation with a tutor, before you organise an event to present your project plans, and then complete a formal application, drawing upon prior knowledge and skills identified and refined in this module.
Analyse volumes of recently published poetry (2009-12) and consider them alongside a range of influential contemporary statements on the genre including pieces by Martin Heidegger and Jacques Derrida.
This module will introduce a range of post-millennial Anglophone Caribbean texts. You'll discuss topics such as how the form and themes of the texts are shaped around music, and whether contemporary Caribbean writers are still responding to postcolonial concerns or if they attempt to untether themselves from the label of the 'postcolonial'. The module will develop your capacity to share ideas and articulate arguments verbally, in particular through oral presentations and group work, and in creative and academic writing.
This module will enable you to undertake a sustained piece of research, or research and creative practice, in English Literature on a topic selected by themselves. Your progress will be overseen by an individual tutor. The particularities of the project, including its topic and its balance of creative, critical, and reflective writing, will be determined in tutorial discussion.