MA

Race, Education and Decolonial Thought

Teaching & Learning

Distance learning

We understand that full-time study does not suit everyone. That’s why we offer courses which give you the opportunity to decide where, when and how you can get involved in learning. Studying a distance learning course offers the convenience and flexibility to make education work for you. Whether you’d like to fit your studies around childcare, develop your skills while working or, quite simply, want to learn from the comfort of your own home, we can help you gain a qualification at a time and pace that suits your lifestyle.

Like our students on campus, you will have the same excellent teaching and learning resources, however you’ll find these online instead of a lecture theatre. Not only are all the modules taught online, but you will also have access to an online community and more than 140,000 books and journals in our online library.

To study this course, you will require broadband internet connection with a speed of 2mbps and working speakers. You will need Windows 7 / Mac OSX 10.8 or above and have access to Chrome v64=3 or higher (recommended). Edge v42+, Firefox v57+ or Safari v6+. Java and Adobe Reader will need to be enabled and you will need a minimum screen resolution of 1024 x 768.

Complete technical requirements are detail in the full guide. Visit our distance learning website

What you'll learn

This module takes coloniality as its starting point in order to look critically at what constitutes decolonial thought and its possible interface with critical race theory.
Examine African descent decolonial viewpoints on race, culture, politics and identity, drawing on Black philosophical, political and social movement interventions from the Caribbean, the USA, Latin America and the UK.
You will appraise writing on critical whiteness studies from a variety of interdisciplinary perspectives and engage with political and philosophical debates on critical whiteness studies.
Develop your own lines of enquiry rooted in a critical understanding of current literature and design and evaluate a research project, which will form the basis of your dissertation proposal.
Focus on and extend your selected area of interest and present this as a substantial piece of primary research or as an extended literature review.
This module takes coloniality as its starting point in order to look critically at what constitutes decolonial thought and its possible interface with critical race theory.
Examine African descent decolonial viewpoints on race, culture, politics and identity, drawing on Black philosophical, political and social movement interventions from the Caribbean, the USA, Latin America and the UK.
You will appraise writing on critical whiteness studies from a variety of interdisciplinary perspectives and engage with political and philosophical debates on critical whiteness studies.
Develop your own lines of enquiry rooted in a critical understanding of current literature and design and evaluate a research project, which will form the basis of your dissertation proposal.
Focus on and extend your selected area of interest and present this as a substantial piece of primary research or as an extended literature review.

What you'll learn

Explore the ways in which childhood has been conceived of by a variety of different disciplines, and the contribution of the social studies of childhood towards advancing our understanding of contemporary childhood.
A critical advanced perspective on the fields of ethnicity, migration (forced and unforced) and diaspora studies, you will engage with ethnicity, migration and diaspora as local state and global concern across a variety of historical and contemporary case study contexts.
Explore the ways that children develop concepts of social identities from early years to adolescence. You will investigate the ways in which social, political and cultural forces influence children's identities and the extent to which identity is assumed or enforced
Adopt a multidisciplinary approach to understanding childhood and early years as these have been constructed, and reconstructed in the 20th and 21st centuries. You will explore the discursive construction of childhood using a range of different source material including visual culture, popular culture and media.
You will be introduced to recent theoretical developments in the field of childhood and early years that have sought to 'reclaim' physical, biological and material aspects of childhood as significant elements of children's experiences of the world.
Explore the ways in which childhood has been conceived of by a variety of different disciplines, and the contribution of the social studies of childhood towards advancing our understanding of contemporary childhood.
A critical advanced perspective on the fields of ethnicity, migration (forced and unforced) and diaspora studies, you will engage with ethnicity, migration and diaspora as local state and global concern across a variety of historical and contemporary case study contexts.
Explore the ways that children develop concepts of social identities from early years to adolescence. You will investigate the ways in which social, political and cultural forces influence children's identities and the extent to which identity is assumed or enforced
Adopt a multidisciplinary approach to understanding childhood and early years as these have been constructed, and reconstructed in the 20th and 21st centuries. You will explore the discursive construction of childhood using a range of different source material including visual culture, popular culture and media.
You will be introduced to recent theoretical developments in the field of childhood and early years that have sought to 'reclaim' physical, biological and material aspects of childhood as significant elements of children's experiences of the world.