MA

International Relations

Teaching & Learning

Distance Learning - overall workload

If you choose to study this course by distance learning, as a guideline you will need to allocate around 10 hours per week to complete each module plus a further five hours for additional reading and assignments. These 10 hours of teaching and learning will be delivered using a range of interactive resources, this typically includes audio and video content, group discussions, reflective exercises, quizzes, online reading and much more. All these resources are delivered through our Virtual Learning Environment and can be accessed at a time and place that suits you.

Due to the ongoing Covid-19 pandemic we are currently unable to advise on the mode of teaching for September 2021, however we will keep you updated and provide more information as soon as we can. We continue to follow government guidance and your teaching and learning will reflect the restrictions in place at the time of delivery. We currently anticipate that you may experience a blended approach – this is a mix of face-to-face, on campus and online teaching and learning. You can keep up to date with teaching and learning at Leeds Beckett via our Covid-19 website. Updated course specifications will be available in August 2021. In the meantime, our existing course specifications are available.

What you'll learn

Learn how to deploy the principal classical and contemporary theories of International Relations by developing theory within the context of modern and historical case studies.
Gain an understanding of the concepts, theories and methods used in the study of global development. You will study the origins, evolution and contemporary dynamics of development within the international system and the challenges facing it, and you will be able to apply your knowledge of global development with originality within advanced academic settings.
Explore the contested conceptualisation of human rights, via universalist/relativist and cosmopolitan/communitarian debates, and locate the theorisation of rights within the broad schools of international relations thought.
Explore the possibilities and challenges of taking gender seriously within both international relations and international political economy. You will study key theoretical, conceptual, empirical, and practice debates surrounding the role of gender in international politics and global political economy.
Engage in critical depth with a research-based project aligned to your personal interests and professional aspirations.
Learn how to deploy the principal classical and contemporary theories of International Relations by developing theory within the context of modern and historical case studies.
Gain an understanding of the concepts, theories and methods used in the study of global development. You will study the origins, evolution and contemporary dynamics of development within the international system and the challenges facing it, and you will be able to apply your knowledge of global development with originality within advanced academic settings.
Explore the contested conceptualisation of human rights, via universalist/relativist and cosmopolitan/communitarian debates, and locate the theorisation of rights within the broad schools of international relations thought.
Explore the possibilities and challenges of taking gender seriously within both international relations and international political economy. You will study key theoretical, conceptual, empirical, and practice debates surrounding the role of gender in international politics and global political economy.
Engage in critical depth with a research-based project aligned to your personal interests and professional aspirations.

What you'll learn

Consider how projects fit within organisations, and how they are developed, funded and managed. You will be introduced to the essential components including planning, evaluation, ethics and governance issues, and stakeholder engagement.
Explore acts of war, political violence and ‘crimes of aggression’ through the lens of criminological discourse. You will develop an in-depth understanding of war and its relationship with ‘crime’ by critically evaluating the role of individual states, international communities, as well as victims, bystanders and known perpetrators or combatants.
This module interrogates the concept of insecurity and draws on a range of theories and understandings of security, and how this has evolved from a focus on the state to incorporate human security. You will explore the relationship between conflict, security and development, including the roles of key actors, agencies, policies and interventions, and key intersections of gender, ethnicity, poverty and exclusion. You will also examine responses to traditional and new security threats from a human rights perspective via a range of local and global case studies.
Critically examine the interrelationship between the theoretical rationale for globalisation and its policy and practice in relation to the issues of the political economy of development and growth.
Gain a better understanding of the environmental dilemmas that confront us in the contemporary world, by moving beyond the limitations of mainstream economic analysis in coming to terms with the threats of environmental degradation and climate change. This module tries to reawaken a broader type of ethical, natural and social theorisation which has been present in political economy at least since the 18th century.
Consider how projects fit within organisations, and how they are developed, funded and managed. You will be introduced to the essential components including planning, evaluation, ethics and governance issues, and stakeholder engagement.
Explore acts of war, political violence and ‘crimes of aggression’ through the lens of criminological discourse. You will develop an in-depth understanding of war and its relationship with ‘crime’ by critically evaluating the role of individual states, international communities, as well as victims, bystanders and known perpetrators or combatants.
This module interrogates the concept of insecurity and draws on a range of theories and understandings of security, and how this has evolved from a focus on the state to incorporate human security. You will explore the relationship between conflict, security and development, including the roles of key actors, agencies, policies and interventions, and key intersections of gender, ethnicity, poverty and exclusion. You will also examine responses to traditional and new security threats from a human rights perspective via a range of local and global case studies.
Critically examine the interrelationship between the theoretical rationale for globalisation and its policy and practice in relation to the issues of the political economy of development and growth.
Gain a better understanding of the environmental dilemmas that confront us in the contemporary world, by moving beyond the limitations of mainstream economic analysis in coming to terms with the threats of environmental degradation and climate change. This module tries to reawaken a broader type of ethical, natural and social theorisation which has been present in political economy at least since the 18th century.