INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY and WOMEN'S HISTORY MONTH

#choosetochallenge logo

Rashda Aslam
Nina Cuthbertson, Student in Electronic and Electrical Engineering
Women's History Month

Throughout March, we celebrate women from across our university community who have helped to forge a more gender-equal society. 

For Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day, which takes place on Monday 8 March, the university will recognise the students, colleagues and graduates who have fought for change and tackled societal perceptions. This year’s IWD theme is #ChooseToChallenge, and while many of those highlighted below have managed to excel in their chosen fields, it is also important to remember the many women who ‘choose to challenge’ perceptions and help further the cause for equality on a daily basis.

how we choose to challenge

From academics and colleagues, to students and graduates, find out more about what 'choose to challenge' means to female members of our university community.

  1. "Our role is not to prove we deserve or earn an equal place in society. We are already worthy of that place. Being a woman allows us to bring to the table what our counterparts cannot, and that is our superpower. Being a woman means breaking the limitations of what we have been told we can do, because we can do anything we set our mind to."

    Beatriz Ribeiro | BSc (Hons) Sport & Exercise Nutrition

     
  2. “When a women breaks the norms of society, she is questioned and challenged. Why isn’t everybody else?”

    Celeste Priscilla D Souza | BA (Hons) Business and Management

     
  3. “Times are changing and the world is 'supposedly' evolving but it is quite disturbing to see that the issue surrounding gender (in)equality remains stagnant in the same position. Several great women have tried to change the narrative, but nothing seems strong enough to melt the rock-hard impression made. One of the best solutions I will recommend is for women to create their own definition, values and brand and stick by it without apologies and validation sought from anyone. Do your thing and be proud of it!”

    Maryam Na-Allah Umar-Baba | BA (Hons) Public Relations & Strategic Communications

     
  4. "Challenging inequality can feel a difficult task at times. However, every person who stands up, even when going against the norm, to say something is wrong means we are one step closer to a fairer society. If you can dream it, you can achieve it." 

    Hannah Buckle | Education Studies

  5. "There are many inspirational women in this Universe that we could learn and inspire from. But, why are we still facing the challenges of inequality in many forms in the society? Women should have the courage to challenge what they feel is not right and strive to achieve the best they can. Believe in yourself and you can achieve anything."

    Rashda Aslam | HR Co-ordinator, Leeds Beckett University

  6. "Being a woman should not be a barrier to success in any industry."

    Nina Cuthbertson | BEng Electronic and Electrical Engineering

Beatriz
Image of Celeste D Souza
Image of Maryam Na-Allah Umar-Baba
image of hannah buckle
Rashda Aslam
Nina Cuthbertson, Student in Electronic and Electrical Engineering

It is important for women to ‘choose to challenge’ by bringing our unique contributions to all leadership teams and decision-making bodies. Of course, this isn’t always an easy thing to do and so we need to support each other to challenge inequalities.

There are effective and inspirational women working in leadership roles across every part of health and social care. They have been an integral part of our response to the Covid-19 pandemic, leading advances in risk reduction, diagnosis, treatment, and care of those affected. As women leaders we have a vital role to play in addressing societal challenges and our recovery from them.

You don't need to be PERFECT. You don't need to be BETTER THAN. Be as good as and let your skills and experience make a job uniquely yours: your magic can't be captured in any job spec.

  1. "Change is less about revolution and more about the daily acts that drive evolution. Supporting female colleagues, celebrating their success, and checking and challenging decisions for gender bias is something we must choose to do every day to make sure that we keep moving forward."

    Tracey Lancaster | Deputy Vice Chancellor (Resources), Leeds Beckett University

  2. "UK arms sales are prolonging the Saudi war in Yemen, killing tens of thousands of civilians, and leaving 5 million on the brink of famine. A quarter of civilian deaths are women and children. End the arms trade."

    Dr Jill Gibbon
Deputy Vice Chancelllor, Tracey Lancaster
Dr Jill Gibbon, Senior Lecturer

Leeds Beckett Graduates

From sailing trailblazers, to eco-friendly tourism leaders, graduates from Leeds Beckett are choosing to challenge perceptions in today's society. Read about their stories and what IWD means to them.


#WECAN

Led by Leeds Beckett University, the three-year #WECAN (Women Empowered through Coaching and Networking) project aims to enhance the resilience and growth of small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) by building the leadership skills, capabilities and opportunities of women in the Leeds City Region.

The production line at Burton's

Women of the Leeds Blitz

In 2020 students from the BA (Hons) History course researched the impact of the bombing of Leeds in 1941. One of the research strands was the impact on and role played by the women of Leeds.

Beckett Talks....

Beckett Talks are published regularly across a range of podcast platforms, sharing the experiences and expertise of our academic, student and graduate communities. For Women's History Month we are highlighting the work of some of our female colleagues and how their work is impacting women across the globe.

Breaking out of stereotypes

You've been given one life and one body, why would you ever let the anti-aging industry dictate how you feel about it?" Professsor Jayne Raisborough of the School of Cultural Studies and Humanities shares her research on the role of imagination in breaking free from harmful stereotypes, ageism and body shaming.

Podcast hub

How sport can empower women in Kenya

In a country where opportunity is so tied to education, girls are frequently left behind due to their cultural and economic circumstances. Senior Lecturer at the Carnegie School of Sport, Dr Lisa O’Keeffe explains how sports programmes are providing new growth and leadership opportunities for young women in Kenya to discover and use their potential.

Podcast hub

Spotlight on Research: Celebrating Women Researchers

Dr Louisa Ashley, Head of Subject at Leeds Law School, is in conversation with four of her colleagues to find out more about their research. Join them as they discuss perspectives on vulnerability and sexual assault, therapeutic jurisprudence and problem solving courts, show trials and fishing.

Podcast Hub

Ethnicity and health

Public health nutritionist Dr Maria Maynard from the School of Clinical and Applied Sciences shares how she works across disciplines to remove the systematic barriers that make it harder for people to improve their health outcomes.

Podcast Hub

Breaking out of stereotypes

You've been given one life and one body, why would you ever let the anti-aging industry dictate how you feel about it?" Professsor Jayne Raisborough of the School of Cultural Studies and Humanities shares her research on the role of imagination in breaking free from harmful stereotypes, ageism and body shaming.

How sport can empower women in Kenya

In a country where opportunity is so tied to education, girls are frequently left behind due to their cultural and economic circumstances. Senior Lecturer at the Carnegie School of Sport, Dr Lisa O’Keeffe explains how sports programmes are providing new growth and leadership opportunities for young women in Kenya to discover and use their potential.

Spotlight on Research: Celebrating Women Researchers

Dr Louisa Ashley, Head of Subject at Leeds Law School, is in conversation with four of her colleagues to find out more about their research. Join them as they discuss perspectives on vulnerability and sexual assault, therapeutic jurisprudence and problem solving courts, show trials and fishing.

Ethnicity and health

Public health nutritionist Dr Maria Maynard from the School of Clinical and Applied Sciences shares how she works across disciplines to remove the systematic barriers that make it harder for people to improve their health outcomes.

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