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Dr Andrew Wilson


About Dr Andrew Wilson

Dr Wilson is an internationally recognised expert in perception, action and embodied cognition.

Dr Wilson gained his PhD in Psychology and Cognitive Science from Indiana University, Bloomington in 2005. His research interests are broadly in the area of perception and action, with a particular interest in learning and theories of embodied cognition.

His current research interests include:

  • Using coordinated rhythmic movement as a model system to study learning and social coordination
  • Throwing for distance and accuracy
  • The use of movement analysis (kinematics) to enhance clinical practice and rehabilitation
  • Theories of embodied cognition

He blogs about this work at Notes fromTwo Scientific Psychologists and is on Twitter.

Current Teaching

  • Foundation Research Methods
  • Advance Research Methods
  • Mind, Brain & Behaviour
  • The Embodied Mind (MSc)

Research Interests

Perception and Action
Skilled movement requires us to perceive the affordances of the environment. These are the opportunities for action that the environment provides (e.g. the 'graspability' of a handle); identifying these and the information for them is a critical part of understanding why we move the way we do. Dr Wilson's work currently focuses on two tasks (coordinated rhythmic movement and throwing for distance and accuracy) to investigate these questions. He uses movement analysis and psychophysical techniques combined with computer simulations and dynamical systems modelling to solve these problems.

Embodied Cognition
There is a large body of evidence that cognition is profoundly shaped by the way we perceive and act in the world. Using his empirical research in perception and action as a starting point, Dr Wilson (with colleagues in the UK, US and Canada) is developing theories and methods for an embodied approach to cognition that can be applied to a wide variety of topics (including movement but also language and animal cognition).

Selected Publications

Journal articles (38)

Conference contributions (1)

  • van Swieten LM; van Bergen E; Williams JHG; Plumb MS; Wilson AD; Kent SW; Mon-Williams MA (2007) Grasp selection in children with and without neurodevelopmental disorder (DCD and ASD) Amsterdam, NL 31/05/2007.

Conference proceedings (13)

  • Coats R; Wilson A; Snapp-Childs W; Fath A; Bingham G (2013) The 50s cliff: Perceptuo-Motor Learning Rate Across the Lifespan. In: . : Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, pp. 483-483.
    https://doi.org/10.1167/13.9.483
  • Wilson A; Weightman A; Zhu Q; Bingham G (2013) Using Dynamical Simulations to Quantify Affordances in the Task Space for Throwing to Hit Distant Targets. In: . : Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, pp. 749-749.
    https://doi.org/10.1167/13.9.749
  • Zhu Q; Wilson A; Bingham G (2013) Common Coding Not Supported: Expert and Novice Throwers Viewing Point-Light Displays of Self vs Other's Throwing Motions to Judge Target Locations. In: . : Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, pp. 761-761.
    https://doi.org/10.1167/13.9.761
  • Leech JD; Wilson AD (2012) Perceptual learning of bimanual coordinated rhythmic movements: Information matters more than movements. In: . : Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, pp. 833-833.
    https://doi.org/10.1167/12.9.833
  • Coats R; Snapp-Childs W; Wilson AD; Bingham GP (2011) Changes in perceptual-motor learning across the lifespan: 20, 60, 70, and 80 year olds. In: . : Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, pp. 471-471.
    https://doi.org/10.1167/11.11.471
  • Coats RO; Snapp-Childs W; Wilson AD; Bingham GP (2011) Changes in perceptual-motor learning across the lifespan. In: . : HUMAN KINETICS PUBL INC 1607 N MARKET ST, PO BOX 5076, CHAMPAIGN, IL 61820-2200 USA, pp. S65-S65.http://journals.humankinetics.com/AcuCustom/SiteName/Documents/DocumentItem/S47-S125.pdf
  • Snapp-Childs W; Wilson AD; Bingham GP (2010) The stability of rhythmic movement coordination depends on relative speed. In: . : Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, pp. 1037-1037.
    https://doi.org/10.1167/10.7.1037
  • Bingham GP; Snapp-Childs W; Wilson AD (2010) Modeling the visual coordination task in de Rugy et al.: It's perception, perception, perception. In: . : Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, pp. 1035.
    https://doi.org/10.1167/10.7.1035
  • Snapp-Childs W; Bingham G; Wilson A (2009) Improved perception immediately leads to improved movement stability. In: . : Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, pp. 878.
    https://doi.org/10.1167/9.8.878
  • Mon-Williams M; Sheehan S; Wilson AD; Bingham GP (2009) Head-torso coordination and overt shifts in attention. In: . : Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, pp. 837-837.
    https://doi.org/10.1167/9.8.837
  • Wilson A; van Bergen E; van Swieten L; Kent S; Mon-Williams M (2008) Perceptual and performance biases in action selection. In: . : Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, pp. 609-609.
    https://doi.org/10.1167/8.6.609
  • Wilson AD; Plumb M; Williams JHG; Mon-Williams M (2006) 'Sticky attention'in autistic spectrum disorder--visual psychophysics and movement. In: . : PION LTD, pp. 132-132.
  • Wilson AD; Bingham GP; Collins DR (2003) Contribution of Visual vs. Haptic Perception to the Stability of Relative Phase in Coordinated Movement. In: . : Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, pp. 262-262.

Patents (1)

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