Professor Rachel Julian, Professor

Professor Rachel Julian

Professor

Dr Rachel Julian has 25 years of experience working internationally in peace and conflict including disarmament, peacebuilding, nonviolence and Unarmed Civilian Peacekeeping. She spans the practice-research divide by maintaining strong connections to the practice of creating peaceful communities as well as innovative research in understanding how local people are key to success in prevention violence and sustainable peace.

Rachel's work centres on the importance of engaging, involving, and being led by local people in communities affected by violence, conflict and who work for peace. This focus has included community projects in the UK, the work of international NGO Nonviolent Peaceforce, and AHRC-ESRC PaCCS funded research into how local civilians in Myanmar are entwining their daily lives with non-violently protecting people from armed violence, saving lives and monitoring bi-lateral agreements.

Her work starts from the importance of dealing with violence, but sees this as part of the web of connections that link violence to poverty, climate change and migration. Rachel sits on the Boards of The Old Library project (UK), Peace News Trust and Nonviolent Peaceforce. She gave expert evidence to the sub-committee on Civilian Crisis Management at the German Parliament on Unarmed Civilian Peacekeeping, she has work published, and presents internationally, on Unarmed Civilian Peacekeeping and the importance of local ownership.

PhD students currently include studying traditional conflict resolution mechanisms in South Sudan; the way peace and war are learnt in English secondary schools; and the role of trust in women's conflict resolution organisations.

Professor Rachel Julian, Professor
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Ask Me About

  1. Peace
  2. Community
  3. Poverty
  4. Fundraising

Publications

  • Julian R; Furnari E; Bliesemann de Guevara B (2020), Unarmed Civilian Peacekeeping:

  • Julian R (2015), A Determination to Protect : The State of the Art: Bund für Soziale Verteidigung (Federation for Social Defence)