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Dr Katherine Harrison


Dr Katherine Harrison
Contact Details
Dr Katherine Harrison

Course Director

School of Cultural Studies & Humanities

???? K.M.Harrison@leedsbeckett.ac.uk

About Dr Katherine Harrison

Katherine Harrison joined the School of Cultural Studies and Humanities at Leeds Beckett University as Course Director for BA (Hons) Media and English in September 2017. She previously worked at the University of Chester, where she was Senior Lecturer in Sociology, and the University of Salford, where she taught English Literature and Cultural Studies.

Current Teaching

Katherine currently teaches on the following modules:

  • Cultural Studies (Level 4)
  • Media Past/Present: Where, When? (Level 5)
  • Contested Cultures of Difference (MA, Level 7)

She also supervises undergraduate and postgraduate dissertations and major projects, as well as research students.

Research Interests

Katherine is a cultural researcher with particular interests in visual culture and feminism. Her current research focusses on the following areas:

  1. Women and Craft. This empirical project explores women's experiences of textile handicrafts, particularly knitting, and their relationship to discourses of 'new craft' that construct it as hipster, sexy and 'woke'. The research focuses primarily on older female knitters who are arguably marginalised within media and popular cultural representations of new craft practices.
  2. Stigma and Space. This on-going project (with Professor Jayne Raisborough and Dr Lisa Taylor) examines the role of representations of space in Factual Welfare Programming (FWP), also known as 'poverty porn'. The research analyses representations of streetscapes and domestic spaces in TV programmes such as Channel 5's On Benefits to show how space itself is constructed as tainted and a source of stigmatisation for people who occupy it.
  3. Hoodie Horror. This research analyses representations of 'hoodies' in early-21st century British and European horror film, including Cherry Tree Lane, Eden Lake, Community and Citadel. The research focuses on how white, working-class young men and boys are made horrifying in film and media reports.
  4. Nuclear Images. Images of the mushroom cloud have been ubiquitous in Western visual culture since 1945 and appeared before and, perhaps, over-wrote photographs of the human devastation they emerged from. This project investigates the on-going potency of the mushroom cloud image in sources including news reports, disaster films and album artwork.

Katherine welcomes enquiries from prospective PhD students in relation to any of these areas or visual cultural studies more generally.

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